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Myosotis sp. [Forget-Me-Not]: Stacking a Tiny Flower

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#1 UlfW

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 12:41

For my my first test stack trying my Milar 6.5cm/4.5 I used a very small ForgetMeNot that has been kept reasonably fresh in my fridge for several weeks.
The flowers are very tiny, only slightly a bit more than 1mm in diameter.
The stack is made from 24 images with a filter stack: S8612, 2mm + U-360, 2mm.
Attached Image: Screen Shot 2020-07-13 at 12.00.23.png
Magnification 2.4x on the sensor

A 100% closer crop:
Attached Image: Screen Shot 2020-07-13 at 11.59.25.png
No additional sharpening
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#2 JMC

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 12:55

Blimey. Congratulations, that looks pretty good Ulf.
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#3 nfoto

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:07

More than good, excellent.

#4 UlfW

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:10

Thank you.
With some sharpening it gets even better, but the non focussed areas becomes noisy and some stacking artefacts more visual.
The sharpening has to be done selectively. I have to learn more about how to do that well.

Edited by UlfW, 14 July 2020 - 15:04.

Ulf Wilhelmson
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#5 colinbm

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:10

A tiny 1mm flower......this is fantastic Ulf.

#6 UlfW

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:13

A sharpened part at 100% that looks mostly good:
Attached Image: Screen Shot 2020-07-14 at 15.11.25.png
I now realise that the image above wasn't at 100%. This is.

Edited by UlfW, 14 July 2020 - 13:14.

Ulf Wilhelmson
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#7 colinbm

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:15

Is this snip about 2mm across ?

#8 UlfW

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:20

I think the flower is a Myosotis Stricta.
I picked a tiny bouquet of them in mid May.
This last individual survived at least partly for many weeks in my fridge.
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#9 UlfW

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:24

View Postcolinbm, on 14 July 2020 - 13:15, said:

Is this snip about 2mm across ?
The full image at the top of the thread covers 10 x 15 mm => ca 3.3mm if I do the calculation right.
My guesstimate was slightly off in the first post.

Edited by UlfW, 14 July 2020 - 13:27.

Ulf Wilhelmson
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#10 Stefano

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:37

How is such a tiny flower pollinated?

#11 UlfW

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 13:57

That is the big question, especially as it looks like the active parts are hidden further down in flower.
Here is a VIS stack from the same bouquet when it was fresh back in May, when I was relearning the craft of stacking:
Attached Image: Screen Shot 2020-05-17 at 12.27.36.png

Edited by UlfW, 14 July 2020 - 14:02.

Ulf Wilhelmson
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#12 Bernard Foot

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 15:11

Excellent work, Ulf - and no dust tracks!
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#13 Cadmium

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 19:40

Wow! Great shots, I really like the visual one too!

#14 dabateman

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 04:27

So we need to take over the fridge with subjects as well as the house with photo gear. I will have to remember that.

These are amazing. Excellent.


#15 nfoto

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 09:25

As Myosotis is not 'fauna' by any stretch of imagination, I took the liberty of moving this topic into the Botanical section ....

#16 UlfW

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 11:37

Thanks.
A mental laps of me choosing fauna.
A Myosotis plant is not at all looking like a triffid. :smile:

Edited by UlfW, 15 July 2020 - 11:37.

Ulf Wilhelmson
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#17 nfoto

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 11:43

Aha, another reader of that sci-fi classic The Day of the Triffids -- excellent. John Wyndham had the ability to make believable post-apocalyptic narratives, for sure. In my view, better than 'The Kraken Wakes which followed it.

#18 Andrea B.

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 17:40

Editor's Note: For a topic to be in this section, it must have a searchable title else it breaks my indexing algorithm.

Old Title: Tiny ForgetMeNot
New Title: Myosotis sp. [Forget-Me-Not]: Stacking a Tiny Flower

****

Excellent stack! The details are fascinating.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#19 Andy Perrin

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 20:08

It's fantastic work. I do have a question, though: what is that almost "foggy" appearance in the UV photos? I have seen this in some of mine, but I don't know the cause of it, and it's not with every lens.

#20 Stefano

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 20:32

View PostAndy Perrin, on 15 July 2020 - 20:08, said:

It's fantastic work. I do have a question, though: what is that almost "foggy" appearance in the UV photos? I have seen this in some of mine, but I don't know the cause of it, and it's not with every lens.
I don't see the "fog" in this photos, but my idea is that the glass the lens is made of fluoresces. Some lenses may fluoresce less than others.