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Brassica juncea [Chinese Mustard]

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#1 Andrea B.

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 20:41

Blum, A.G. (2017) Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. (Brassicaceae) Chinese Mustard. Flowers photographed in ultraviolet and visible light. http://www.ultraviol...hinese-mustard/

Shore Cottage, Southwest Harbor, Maine, USA
03 August 2016
Wildflower

Synonyms:
  • Brassica juncea var. crispifolia Bailey
  • Sinapis juncea L.
Comment:
Similar to other yellow Brassicas, B. juncea has UV-bright, false-yellow petals with UV-black veining. The center cluster of unopened buds is also UV-black.

Reference:
1. New England Wild Flower Society (2016) Brasica juncea. Chinese Mustard. https://gobotany.new...rassica/juncea/


Visible Light [f/16 for 1/30" @ ISO-100 with Onboard Flash and Baader UVIR-Block Filter]
Nikon D600-broadband + 105mm f/4.5 UV-Nikkor
Attached Image: brassicaJuncea_visFlash_20160803shoreCottageSwhME_48982pn01.jpg

Ultraviolet Light [f/16 for 15" @ ISO-40 with SB-14 UV-modified Flash and BaaderU UV-Pass Filter]
Nikon D600-broadband + 105mm f/4.5 UV-Nikkor
A long exposure was made to permit multiple flashes for more even coverage.
Attached Image: brassicaJuncea_uvBaadSB14_20160803shoreCottageSwhME_49019pnStack01.jpg

Visible Light [f/8 for 1/400" @ ISO-125 with Onboard Flash and Baader UVIR-Block Filter]
Nikon D810 + 60mm f/2.8G Micro-Nikkor
Stem detail

Attached Image: brassicaJuncea_20160803shoreCottageSwhME_11649pn.jpg

Visible Light [f/8 for 1/400" @ ISO-220 with Onboard Flash and Baader UVIR-Block Filter]
Nikon D810 + 60mm f/2.8G Micro-Nikkor
Leaf at bottom of plant

Attached Image: brassicaJuncea_20160803shoreCottageSwhME_11646pn.jpg

Visible Light [f/8 for 1/400" @ ISO-180 with Onboard Flash and Baader UVIR-Block Filter]
Nikon D810 + 60mm f/2.8G Micro-Nikkor
Leaf at top of plant

Attached Image: brassicaJuncea_20160803shoreCottageSwhME_11645pn.jpg
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#2 Hornblende

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 22:16

This is my favorite of the day! It looks almost dead and dry in UV light.

#3 Andrea B.

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 14:07

The short UV wavelengths reveal a lot of surface texture. That can sometimes give an impression of dryness.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.