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Eremophila accrescens

Fluorescence
3 replies to this topic

#1 DaveO

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 04:05

Oldfield, D. 2016. Eremophila accrescens Chinnock. (Scrophulariacea) Flowers photographed in visible and ultraviolet light.
http://www.ultraviol...ila-accrescens/

Maldon, Victoria, Australia
31 December 2016
Australian Native Wildflower as Garden Specimen

Comment

Eremophila accrescens is a rare species named by R J Chinnock in 2007 from specimens he collected southeast of Ashburton Downs, Western Australia, in September 1979. It is suspected to be a hybrid between E. cuneifolia and E. phyllopoda with which it was found in the wild.

Visible Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Metz 15 MS-1 flash, 1/200 s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV/IR Cut Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_accrescens_2_Vis.jpg
Image Reference: DO64063

Ultraviolet Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Nissin Di866 Mark II flash, 1/200s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV-Pass Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_accrescens_2_UV.jpg
Image Reference: DO64066

Ultraviolet Induced Visible Fluorescence: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens with Baader UV/IR Cut Filter, Nichia NCSU033A UV-LED with Baader UV-Pass Filter, 10.0 s @ f/16 ISO 1600.
Attached Image: Eremophila_accrescens_2_UVIVFL.jpg
Image Reference: DO64067

The flowers were sectioned to more clearly see inside the corolla for the following photographs.

Visible Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Metz 15 MS-1 flash, 1/200 s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV/IR Cut Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_accrescens_S_Vis.jpg
Image Reference: DO64075

Ultraviolet Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Nissin Di866 Mark II flash, 1/200s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV-Pass Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_accrescens_S_UV.jpg
Image Reference: DO64077

Ultraviolet Induced Visible Fluorescence: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens with Baader UV/IR Cut Filter, Nichia NCSU033A UV-LED with Baader UV-Pass Filter, 10.0 s @ f/16 ISO 1600.
Attached Image: Eremophila_accrescens_S_UVIVFL.jpg
Image Reference: DO64078


References:
Chinnock, R.J. Eremophila and Allied Genera, Rosenberg, 2007, p. 342.
Boschen, N., Goods, M. and Wait, R. Australia’s Eremophilas – changing gardens for a changing climate, Bloomings Books, 2008, p. 63.
Brown, A. and Buirchell, B. A Field Guide to the Eremophilas of Western Australia, Simon Nevill Publications, 2011, p. 32.

Published 14 January 2017

Edited by DaveO, 14 January 2017 - 04:06.


#2 Andy Perrin

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 05:01

Nice. A case where the UV was the most interesting of the three images, beating out the fluorescence in my opinion!

#3 Andrea B.

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 16:57

Yes, it's sometimes hard to predict which will be the more interesting.


Dave, I really like your cut-away of the flower. I did that once with a Daffodil and it was quite interesting.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#4 DaveO

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 05:30

I find images of Eremophilas with tubular corollas leave me wanting to try to see inside to perhaps see how they would be seen by an insect, I've only just started this crazy idea so I will add them to existing posts as the flowers are available. I don't think I will do it for daisy type flowers where you can see all the action and it will only be used on studio shots not those taken in the wild. This particular eremophila is insect pollinated, bird pollinated ones, which I will post, show UV black both inside and outside. There's a PhD in this if you know any students.

Dave