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Eremophila calorhabdos [Red Rod]

Fluorescence Conical Cells
3 replies to this topic

#1 DaveO

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 04:50

Oldfield, D. 2013. Eremophila calorhabdos Diels (Scrophulariaceae) Red Rod. Flowers photographed in visible and ultraviolet light. http://www.ultraviol...habdos-red-rod/

Synonym
Stenochilus calorhabdos (Diels) Kraenzl.

Comment
The name of this eremophila is said to mean ‘beautiful wand’. This bird pollinated (ornithophilous) eremophila has a pink corolla which is the typical shape for eremophila pollinated by honeyeaters and other Australian birds with long slender beaks which visit the flowers for their nectar.


SET 1
Maldon, Victoria, Australia
25 December 2013
Australian Native Wildflower as Garden Specimen

Visible Light: Pentax K-5 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Metz 15 MS-1 flash, 1/180 s @ f/16 ISO 200, B+W UV/IR Cut Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_calorhabdos_Vis.jpg
Image Reference: DO51995

Ultraviolet Light: Pentax K-5 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Nikon SB-14 flash, 1/180s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV-Pass Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_calorhabdos_UV.jpg
Image Reference: DO51998

100% closeup extract from UV image
The conical cells covering the inner surface of the corolla are clearly visible
Attached Image: E_calorhabdos_UV_extract.jpg


SET 2
Maldon, Victoria, Australia
1 March 2015
Australian Native Wildflower as Garden Specimen

Visible Light: Pentax K-5 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Metz 15 MS-1 flash, 1/180 s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV/IR Cut Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_calorhabdos_Vis.jpg
Image Reference: DO54286

Ultraviolet Light: Pentax K-5 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Nissin Di866 Mark II flash, 1/180s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV-Pass Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_calorhabdos_UV.jpg
Image Reference: DO54289

Ultraviolet Induced Visible Fluorescence: Pentax K-5 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens with Baader UV/IR Cut Filter, Nichia NCSU033A UV-LED with Baader UV-Pass Filter, 30.0 s @ f/11 ISO 200.
Attached Image: Eremophila_calorhabdos_UVIVFL_.jpg
Image Reference: DO54294



References:
1. Chinnock, R.J. Eremophila and Allied Genera, Rosenberg, 2007, p. 569.
2. Boschen, N., Goods, M. and Wait, R. Australia’s Eremophilas – changing gardens for a changing climate, Bloomings Books, 2008, p.35.
3. Atlas of Living Australia http://bie.ala.org.a...ila+calorhabdos

SET 1: Published 1 January 2014
SET 2: Published 1 March 2015

#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 15:21

I've read about this -- that these bird-pollinated Eremophila do not have the "landing platform" structure of the insect-pollinated Eremophila which seem to have an overall more horizontal placement on the stems with a larger flatter lower lip.

Did you look into the flower tube? Is the nectar obviously pooled in the tube?

Dave, you can add a conical cell "tag" to this post in the Full Editor. We do not use many tags, but that is one of them.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 DaveO

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 23:27

The visible image probably doesn't show that these bird-pollinated flowers also usually hang with the tube horizontal and the lower "lip" pointing down vertically, so it's usually a challenge to get down below the flower and look up into it, this one just happened to be leaning backwards. The honeyeaters don't hover like humming-birds but perch on the plant to put their slender and often curving beaks into the flowers from a horizontal position. They often also have brush type tongues to lick up the nectar, I've not really looked for nectar but my guess is that it would be very hard to see and I don't think there would be much there, especially given how active our honeyeaters are most of the time. I'll post some more in a more typical alignment, they are flowers which really do benefit from focus stacking but I've not got around to trying that with my current set up.

#4 colinbm

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 04:37

Another great collection Dave
Col