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Lee 115 + GRB3

Infrared
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#1 Nisei

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Posted 29 June 2020 - 20:46

Some work in progress with Lee 115 + GRB3 (2mm) taken with a Sony Nex-3N full spectrum and Canon EF 24mm F/2.8 iS USM
Colors are pretty much straight out of camera with just some corrections to exposure, contrast and sharpening.
This topic will be updated now and then

Attached Image: Eebuurt.jpg

Attached Image: bridge.jpg

Attached Image: Redtree.jpg

Attached Image: flower.jpg

Attached Image: Street.jpg

Edited by Nisei, 29 June 2020 - 23:05.


#2 Cadmium

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Posted 29 June 2020 - 22:01

Nisei, Those look good!

#3 Nisei

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Posted 29 June 2020 - 22:55

Thanks Steve
I know you prefer a more dominant red but I really feel like I want to explore the possibilities of this stack since it's given me some really nice reds besides the orange. The only downside I've noticed so far is that the dramatic sky effect isn't there. Everything looks just like a regular picture except for trees and foliage and of course black clothing. I haven't taken pics of my color checker card yet but I will soon.
Oh by the way, I've also tried using the GRB3 with my regular IR workflow (099 and swapping to IRG) but that doesn't seem to work AT ALL.
Even after white balancing in camera it creates a terrible green/cyan color cast which I haven't yet been able to correct in post.

Edited by Nisei, 29 June 2020 - 23:08.


#4 Cadmium

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 02:45

What I like about it is the natural sky, the the mix of other natural visual colors, it has a nice range of visual colors mixing in with the orange and reds.
I don't know if my camera would do the same. I only have that filter in the swatch book.
I don't remember if I have tried stacking KG3/KG1 with any false color IR filters for swapping. I don't think I have tried swapping KG stacks.
I have used KG mostly with dualband filters so far.

Edited by Cadmium, 30 June 2020 - 02:48.


#5 Nisei

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 16:50

View PostCadmium, on 30 June 2020 - 02:45, said:

I don't remember if I have tried stacking KG3/KG1 with any false color IR filters for swapping. I don't think I have tried swapping KG stacks.
I recall reading an old Kodak patent or technical paper where it said they were using a #12 filter and a weak IR blocking filter to simulate their EIR film with digital cameras. I can't find it anymore though (should have bookmarked it).
Do you know if there's a weak IR blocking filter that doesn't have a blue/green tint like KG3 and GRB3?

#6 Cadmium

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 17:58

Nisei, I think I remember the topic you are thinking about, but I could not find it either.
I have yet to try stacking Tiffen #12 with KG to see how that might change things.
I don't know of any filter that has the same IR transmission as KG that doesn't have some slight color. KG is very faint color.
However, that faint color doesn't block any visual, the transmission of pretty flat from below 400nm to about 600nm, then it starts to taper down, slowly attenuating the IR range.

#7 Nisei

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 21:54

Would be nice if you could give it a try Steve.
I didn't expect GRB3 to have such a huge impact on color/white balance when stacked with 550nm (or anything between 520-550) but so far I haven't been able to get any usable results.

#8 Nisei

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 22:30

View PostCadmium, on 30 June 2020 - 17:58, said:

However, that faint color doesn't block any visual...
But doesn't the faint color proof it's blocking visual? If it didn't it would look perfectly clear. Or am I missing something?

#9 Andy Perrin

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 22:57

Maybe he meant "not blocking a significant amount of visual"?

#10 Cadmium

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 23:08

That is an interesting point, but remember cameras stock or modified are full spectrum, and the stock versions have BG glass built in,
they are set up to respond to BG and are also able to wb using various types of BG, so it gets a little complicated for me to wrap my mind around,
but to simplify, the camera sees that blue green glass as clear, in a sense, it sees things thorough that BG the way we do through nothing.
I may be rambling here, but you see what I mean.
But other than some dichroic type coated clear filter, that might possibly have a similar IR tapering, I don't know what else would look clear and still gradually taper the IR.
The BG and KG have color to our eyes, because we see the spectrum of visual differently,
however, in fact the KG especially has a fairly flat visual range transmission, but the visual spectrum is not flat... so now it is getting too complicated for me again. I like working with my hands mostly. :tongue:

But yes, that is a good idea, I will do a comparison test between 550nm and 500nm + KG3 stacked.\

These are the only orange foliage photos I have liked. There are so many other visual range colors in them that look natural.

Edited by Cadmium, 30 June 2020 - 23:15.


#11 colinbm

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 02:36

Nisei, this is what you are photographing with the GRB3 + Lee115....in full sunlight...

Attached Image: 20200701 GRB3 + Lee115 in full sunlight.jpg

Edited by colinbm, 01 July 2020 - 02:39.


#12 Nisei

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 08:42

View Postcolinbm, on 01 July 2020 - 02:36, said:

Nisei, this is what you are photographing with the GRB3 + Lee115....in full sunlight...
Thanks for the graph Colin.
Nice to see the colors of the spectrum inside the graph.