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Structures in the masonry of a church

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#1 WiSi-Testpilot

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 15:57

At the St.Vitus church in the neighbour village Südlohn I have had noticed some X-structures in the masonry. Now I took some NIR and Vis images. The harder burned and thus darker stones were used as half stones or header. At the ground the pattern is not fully random. Maybe, after a few meters they noticed the pattern. The structures are also visible in the visual spectral range, but are more clear in the NIR.

Gear:
NIR: Sony A 6000, Noflexar 35/3.5, Green.L 950 nm Filter (The combination has no hot spot up to F16)
Vis: Nikon Coolpix S3200 pocket camera.

Nov.15.2018
Suedlohn2058, F3.5, 1/30 sec., ISO 3200
Attached Image: Suedlohn2058.jpg

Suedlohn4106, F3.5, 1/50 sec., ISO 80
Attached Image: Suedlohn4106.jpg

Suedlohn2060 F3.5, 1/60 sec., ISO 2500
Attached Image: Suedlohn2060.jpg

Suedlohn4107, F3.5, 1/50 sec., ISO 80
Attached Image: Suedlohn4107.jpg

Nov.11.2018,
Suedlohn1960, F3.5, 1/60 sec., ISO 2000
Attached Image: Suedlohn1960.jpg

#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 18 November 2018 - 21:39

Very interesting example of the usage of NIR to better see differences.

But it isn't the NIR here that makes me ask questions.
Rather, I am wondering about the masons and their bricks. :D

Do you think that the pattern made by the dark bricks was not intentionally produced by the masons? In other words, the pattern was simply an accidental by-product of the way the bricks had been stacked for use by the masons? If so, then I am wondering how they were able to randomize the bricks to prevent the pattern from occuring in the top levels? Sometimes such randomization is not an easy task. Do all sides of the church show this pattern in the lower portion?

Added: Wilhelm, I didn't meant to put *you* on the spot for answers here as though you were a masonry expert. Those are just the questions which arose while I was thinking about these photos. :lol:
Andrea G. Blum
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#3 WiSi-Testpilot

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 18:10

Andrea, thank you.
Not all sides of the church show the pattern in the lower part but also in some other places, see pictures. The church was built at least at three different times. The patterns are only on the part that was built as the penultimate.
I have already interviewed some people, but no one could give me information until now. I will try to get further information.
Best regards,
Wilhelm

Nov.15.2018,
Suedlohn2049 F3.5, 1/60 sec., ISO 1000
The oldest part is at the right side.
Attached Image: Suedlohn2049.JPG

Nov.15.2018,
Suedlohn2041, F3.5, 1/25 sec., ISO 3200
Attached Image: Suedlohn2041.JPG

Nov.11.2018,
Suedlohn1973, F3.5, 1/60 sec., ISO 3200
The oldest part is at the left side.
Attached Image: Suedlohn1973.jpg

Sony Pancake
Nov.11.2018,
Suedlohn1992. F2.8, 1/60 sec., ISO 1600
Attached Image: Suedlohn1992.jpg

#4 UlfW

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 06:52

View PostAndrea B., on 18 November 2018 - 21:39, said:

Very interesting example of the usage of NIR to better see differences.

But it isn't the NIR here that makes me ask questions.
Rather, I am wondering about the masons and their bricks. :D

Do you think that the pattern made by the dark bricks was not intentionally produced by the masons? In other words, the pattern was simply an accidental by-product of the way the bricks had been stacked for use by the masons? If so, then I am wondering how they were able to randomize the bricks to prevent the pattern from occuring in the top levels? Sometimes such randomization is not an easy task. Do all sides of the church show this pattern in the lower portion?



I had similar thoughts.

This old castle, built 1537 and then restored one century later that has similar patterns:

Attached Image: Screen Shot 2018-11-20 at 07.43.53.png
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 22:29

I prowled around the internet on masonry sites and learned that the diamond patterning is called "diapering" from from the name of a old medieval white cloth which was patterned with small diamond shapes. In English the word "diaper" also eventually became the name for the white cloths used as a baby's nappy.

This particular masonry diamond pattern is the Flemish Diamond Bond.

Bricks are rather interesting!!
Here is one website: http://brickofchicago.com
Click on the "learn" tab for a brief intro to some terms and patterns.

That fellow on Bricks of Chicago became interested in bricks, made lots of photos and now markets a calendar to the locals. Wonder if any of us could sell a UV photo calendar? :lol: :lol: :lol:




If you want more info about the medieval white diamond patterned cloth, go here. There is also a discussion of the origins of "diaper" versus "nappy".
https://www.darlings...y-versus-diaper
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#6 Shane

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Posted 22 November 2018 - 18:32

I have seen this pattern, visible by eye, many times in brick structures in England. It is all part of the design.