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tree id?

Infrared
9 replies to this topic

#1 bobfriedman

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 21:26

Nikon D800E ,Nikkor 8mm f/2.8 Fisheye Ai-S ,RG-830
1/100s f/8.0 at 8.0mm iso200
Posted Image

Nikon D800E ,Nikkor 8mm f/2.8 Fisheye Ai-S ,RG-830
1/80s f/8.0 at 8.0mm iso200
Posted Image

#2 nfoto

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 00:04

A Tolkien tree.

#3 Andy Perrin

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 00:39

Could be a C. S. Lewis tree?

#4 OlDoinyo

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 03:06

Can't make out the foliage. The growth habit and bark texture is consistent with some kind of oak (?)

#5 nfoto

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 10:00

The drooping branches are suggestive of a Willows (Salix).

#6 Andrea B.

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 12:19

It is difficult to determine from such a small photo whether the leaflets of the compound leaf are distinctly opposite or distinctly alternate. Here is a small crop.
Attached Image: original.jpg

If the leaflets are opposite, then the choices are few and the tree is likely some kind of Ash (Fraxinus). But Ash leaflets have pointed tips and these leaflets have rounded tips.

If the leaflets are alternate or slightly so, then we would need to know whether the leaflets had a toothed or lobed edge or a smooth unlobed edge in order to continue.

For the combo of alternate leaflet and toothed or lobed edge, the possibilities include Mountain Ash (Sorbus) or Walnut (Juglans). But, again, their leaflets have pointed tips.

For the combo of opposite leaflet and smooth edge, there is the possibility of Black Locust (Robinia). Although Robinia is not a native tree to the Northeast US, this tree's leaves/leaflets do look very much like Black Locust. In a park like this, many of the plantings can be non-native. This complicates things greatly. But I would tentatively say Black Locust.
Andrea G. Blum
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#7 nfoto

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 13:06

You're developing into a diagnostic botanist ... kudos

#8 bobfriedman

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 15:17

i went back today and sure enough the tree was marked.

Weeping Japanese Pagoda Tree - Styphnolobium Japonicum - 'Pendula'

Attached Images

  • Attached Image: _DSC4603.jpg

Edited by bobfriedman, 08 July 2018 - 15:36.


#9 Alaun

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 17:12

That's how to put a tree into a frame!
Werner

#10 enricosavazzi

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 18:55

This used to be called Sophora japonica when I studied botanics (close to half a century ago). Without seeing the label or looking at the leaflets I would have guessed some sort of weeping willow (yanagi in Japanese).

PS - I lived almost two years very close to Demachiyanagi (出町柳) in Kyoto - that is why I happen to know.

Edited by enricosavazzi, 08 July 2018 - 19:01.

-- Enrico Savazzi