• Ultraviolet Photography
  •  

Baileya multiradiata [Desert Marigold]


8 replies to this topic

#1 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location: UVP Western Division, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Posted 18 May 2013 - 01:15

Blum, A.G. (2013) Baileya multiradiata Harvey & A. Gray ex A.Gray (Asteraceae) Desert Marigold. Flowers photographed in ultraviolet and visible light. http://www.ultraviol...esert-marigold/

Synonyms:
  • Hierba Amarilla
Comment:
The silvery-green, woolly foliage and the long leafless stems topped by the cheerful bright yellow daisies make for easy recognition of this native plant which grows abundantly along the roadsides in the desert southwestern US. Its appearance in ultraviolet is uniformly UV-dark but with some patchy, bright iridescence as the light plays across the flower head.

Reference:
1. Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attached Image: baileyaMultiradiataSign_042213desBotGardPhoenixAZ_287origProofPn.jpg
2. Epple, A.O. (1995) Desert Marigold, page 261. A Field Guide to the Plants of Arizona. Falcon Guides, Globe Pequot Press, Guilford, CT.

SET 1
Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
22 April 2013
Wildflower in botanical garden

Equipment: [Nikon D600-broadband + Nikon 105mm f/4.5 UV-Nikkor]

Visible Light [f/6.3 for 1/1600" @ ISO 100 with Nikon Coolpix A]
Attached Image: baileyaMultiradiataVisSun_042213desBotGardPhoenixAZ_255proofPnCrop.jpg

Visible Light [f/8 for 1/500" @ ISO 100 in Sunlight with Baader UVIR-Block Filter]
Attached Image: baileyaMultiradiataVisSun_042213desBotGardPhoenixAZ_7788proofPnCrop.jpg

Ultraviolet Light [f/4.5 for 1/160" @ ISO 800 with SB-14 UV-modified Flash and Baader UV-Pass Filter]
Attached Image: baileyaMultiradiataUVBaadSB14_042213desBotGardPhoenixAZ_7801proofPnCrop.jpg

SET 2
Boyce Thompson Arboretum, Superior, Arizona, USA
23 April 2013
Wildflower in botanical garden

Equipment: [Nikon D600-broadband + Nikon 105mm f/4.5 UV-Nikkor]

Visible Light [f/5.6 for 1/800" @ ISO 100 with Nikon Coolpix A]
Attached Image: baileyaMultiradiataVisFlash_042313boyceThompsonArbSuperiorAZ_542origProofPn.jpg

Ultraviolet Light [f/5.6 for 1/60" @ ISO 800 with SB-14 UV-modified Flash and Baader UV-Pass Filter]
Attached Image: pic_042313boyceThompArbSuperiorAZ_8715origProofPn.jpg
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#2 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location: UVP Western Division, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Posted 29 May 2020 - 17:09

SET 3
El Dorado at Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, USA
23 May 2020
Wildflower

I pushed the saturation of the UV flower to find the underlying false colors which are less evident in preceding examples.
I messed up the flower name! Should be Baileya multiradiata.
Attached Image: baileyaMultiradiata_20200523elDoradoNM_19829_CollageResize.jpg
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 colinbm

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 2,590 posts
  • Location: Australia

Posted 30 May 2020 - 02:16

Those colours are strong Andrea.
I am wondering what the UV+Blue+Green, would look like with the UV blocked, It seems to me that the UV isn't doing much ?
Cheers
Col

#4 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location: UVP Western Division, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Posted 30 May 2020 - 05:05

That’s right, Col. UV is not doing much here because not much UV is being reflected by this flower. So most of the wavelengths passing through the UV+Blue+Green filter are visible reflections.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#5 Bill De Jager

    Member

  • Members
  • 311 posts
  • Location: Northern California, USA

Posted 30 May 2020 - 17:33

Nice results, Andrea. It's amazing how uniformly dark the flowers are in UV. We also have this flower in the desert regions of southeastern California.

BTW, the scientific name on set 3 should be Baileya multiradiata. I think the specific epithet refers to the unusual abundance of ray flowers in the flower heads in this species.
Studying the botany and plant geography of California and western North America for almost 50 years.

#6 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location: UVP Western Division, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Posted 21 July 2020 - 17:19

I wonder how I screwed that up?? Thank you for catching the name error, Bill.

In natural light, the reflectivity along the tips and edges of the rays is more obvious than it is in my indoor, artificially lit photo. I think for flowers the natural sunlight might be the best way to document them. Not always easy when the breezes are blasting away outdoors here in New Mexico. :lol:
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#7 Bill De Jager

    Member

  • Members
  • 311 posts
  • Location: Northern California, USA

Posted 21 July 2020 - 22:27

You're welcome, Andrea. Don't feel bad - it hasn't happened on this site but I've been known to spell my own name Blil, and Denise ended up as Densie. :omy: At least that last one I caught before I posted it. :angel:
Studying the botany and plant geography of California and western North America for almost 50 years.

#8 Bernard Foot

    Bernard Foot

  • Members+G
  • 722 posts
  • Location: UK

Posted 22 July 2020 - 12:41

Beautiful pictures, Andrea - and well presented.
Bernard Foot

#9 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,961 posts
  • Location: UVP Western Division, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Posted 13 May 2021 - 17:41

Thank you, Bernard.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.