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Nepenthes reinwardtiana [Reinwardt's Pitcher Plant]: Revisited

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#1 Adrian

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 09:39

Davies, A. (2017) Nepenthes reinwardtiana Miq. (1852) Revisited (Nepenthaceae) Reinwardt's Pitcher Plant. Flowers photographed in ultraviolet and visible light. https://www.ultravio...lant-revisited/

Synonyms: Reference:
1. Wikipedia (08 Dec 2020) Nepenthes reinwardtiana. Wikimedia Foundation, San Francisco, CA.
2. Davies, A. (2017) Nepenthes reinwardtiana Miq. (Nepenthaceae) Reinwardt's Pitcher-Plant. Plant photographed in ultraviolet and visible light. http://www.ultraviol...-reinwardtiana/

Comment:
I posted an image of this fascinating Pitcher Plant on the 15th May. The specimen photographed then was of a dried pitcher, sent to me in the post. I have been growing my own specimen over the last few months and managed tro keep it alive and healty on my windowsill. The following result is similar, but still really interesting! There is still no consensus on the role of the "eyes".

Technical specs:
Nikon D300 full spectrum conversion.
El Nikkor 80mm lens with Baader U filter.
Two modified "full spectrum: Metz 45 flash guns.

Attached Image: N. reinwardtiana comp web.jpg
Adrian Davies
www.imagingtheinvisible.com

#2 Andy Perrin

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 18:51

Gorgeous photos!

#3 Andrea B.

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 20:18

Well done!
And how very interesting that the "eyes" are more visible in UV inside that UV-dark rim on the pitcher.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#4 Mark

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 00:42

Very nice photos indeed. At first glance I immediately wondered whether the spots, when viewed from a certain angle/distance/other, would appear to be eyes of some sort - perhaps to deter foragers? Maybe they resemble the female of some pollinator? Something to that effect - at the moment I can't seem to remember what that word/term is for animal mimicry in plants. Very interesting either way though.

#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 08 December 2020 - 19:34

Adrian, I have placed a proper header in the first post so that our Index algorithm will include this topic.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.