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Mazus pumilus [Japanese Mazus]

Conical Cells
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#1 JCDowdy

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 02:20

Dowdy, J.C. (2014) Mazus pumilus (Burm. f.) Steenis (Mazaceae) Japanese Mazus. Photographed in visible and ultraviolet also with conical cells in UV macro.
http://www.ultraviol...new_post&f=553#

Synonym: Mazus japonicus (Thunb.) Kuntze

Common Name: Japanese mazus

Location/Date
Cordova, Tennessee, USA
01 August 2014

Comment/Discussion
An introduced Asian species. Very small ~8mm x 3mm flowers, perhaps showy if not so tiny. Distinct dark on intermediate UV signature following visible yellow patches on the lower lip with the upper lip of the corolla mostly dark. The edge of the toothed upper lip is contrastingly UV bright as is the throat to a lesser degree.

They look a bit velvety up close prompting some macro images also. The surface of the dorsum of the upper lip is predominantly covered by roughly conical (Coke bottle shaped) cells interspersed with taller smooth topped mushroom shaped structures and occasional significantly taller rough topped extensions.

Taxonomic authorities are currently in disagreement as to which family this genus belongs. Initially placed in Scrophulariaceae (Figwort family) then moved to Phrymaceae (Lopseed family) and now into new family – Mazaceae.

Visible light, photographed in full sunlight.
Panasonic DMC-G3 full spectrum modified, CERCO UV type 2178 100mm f/2.8, 1/200 sec, ISO 160 & f/8 which is the smallest aperture for this lens, 1.25” Baader UV/IR cut filter mounted in adapter inside lens shade. Custom in camera white balance on PTFE lens cap.

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_VisPennyResized.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_VisPennyResized.jpg)

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_Vis-LeavesCrop.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_Vis-LeavesCrop.jpg)

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_Vis-QuadCrop.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_Vis-QuadCrop.jpg)

Ultraviolet, photographed in full sunlight.
Panasonic DMC-G3 full spectrum modified, CERCO UV type 2178 100mm f/2.8, shutter 1/3 to 1 sec, ISO 160 & f/8, 1.25” Baader U filter mounted in adapter inside lens shade. Custom in camera white balance on PTFE lens cap.

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UVPennyResized.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UVPennyResized.jpg)

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-QuadCrop.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-QuadCrop.jpg)

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-TwoAngleCrop.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-TwoAngleCrop.jpg)

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-TwoFrontCrop.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-TwoFrontCrop.jpg)

Conical Cells, photographed at ~5.7X, 375nm UV-LED
Panasonic DMC-G3 full spectrum modified, reversed Perti 35mm f/3.5 coupled onto a Petri 200mm f/4 @ f/4, 1.25” Baader U filter mounted in coupling adapter.
Long exposures 10 to 30 sec, ISO 400 & f/8-16 on the reversed 35mm. Custom in camera white balance on 1.25” 99% Specralon reflectance standard.

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-ConicalCellsResized.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-ConicalCellsResized.jpg) Dorsal view, re-scaled not cropped.

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-SelectedCropTwoThirdRescaleA.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-SelectedCropTwoThirdRescaleA.jpg) Selected crop re-scaled 2/3.

Attached Image: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-SelectedCropTwoThirdRescaleB.jpg
(Image Reference: JCD140108_Mazus_japonicus_UV-SelectedCropTwoThirdRescaleB.jpg) Selected crop re-scaled 2/3.

References

1., ANGIOSPERM PHYLOGENY WEBSITE, version 13. (11Sep2011). Missouri Botanical Garden, University of Missouri, St Louis, MO USA.

2. USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service, The Plants Database. (10Sep2014) Mazus pumilus. National Plant Data Team, Greensboro, NC USA.

3., The University of Tennessee Herbarium, Database of Tennessee Vascular Plant Occurrences. (10Sep2014) Mazus pumilus, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996.

4. Southeastern Flora, Southeastern US Plant Identification Resource. (10Sep14) Mazus pumilus Copyright© John R. Gwaltney.

5. Extreme Macro, Stacking Lenses For Macro. (10Sep14) Copyright© Johan J Ingles-Le Nobel.

Published: 11Sep2014

Edited by Andrea B., 15 March 2015 - 19:31.


#2 nfoto

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 11:22

Nice demonstration of the presence of conical cells. These and the overall UV signature remind me of Glechoma hederacea, a wholly unrelated taxon, but sharing the same low growth stature.

Using a dual lens configuration to achieve high magnifications is an interesting alternative to other more traditional techniques. Dr. Brian Caldwell told me it is important to stop down the front lens, not the master prime it is reversed onto.

#3 JCDowdy

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 14:49

Thank you Bjørn!

I thought these were very similar to your Cymbalaria muralis, family Plantaginaceae, I can see how they were at one time assigned to the adjacent Scrophulariaceae family. The new (tentative) family Mazacea lies between Lamiaceae and Phrymaceae so perhaps Mazus pumilus is not so distantly related to Glechoma hederacea after all - unless it gets reassigned to another family yet again!

​I was uncertain if I should have stopped down the front lens like I did, I tried it both ways and the front worked better. However, in retrospect I think I have likely gone over the defraction limit for this lens combination.

Edited by JCDowdy, 12 September 2014 - 14:49.


#4 nfoto

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 15:40

Hm. Actually I had Cymbalaria in mind, and wrote Glechoma. However, either will do for comparison with your Mazus species.