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Verticordia pityrhops

Fluorescence
2 replies to this topic

#1 DaveO

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 04:40

Oldfield, D. 2016. Verticordia pityrhops A.S. George. (Myrtaceae) Flowers photographed in visible and ultraviolet light. http://www.ultraviol...rdia-pityrhops/

Maldon, Victoria, Australia
23 November 2016
Australian Native Wildflower as Garden Specimen

Comment
Verticordia pityrhops was collected in 1972 near East Mount Barren, Fitzgerald River National Park in Western Australia. It was named from the Greek pitys (a pine) and rhops (a shrub) in reference to the habit of the plants.

Visible Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Metz 15 MS-1 flash, 1/200 s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV/IR Cut Filter.
Attached Image: Verticordia_pityrhops_2_Vis.jpg
Image Reference: DO63870

Ultraviolet Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Nissin Di866 Mark II flash, 1/200s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV-Pass Filter.
Attached Image: Verticordia_pityrhops_2_UV.jpg
Image Reference: DO63873

Ultraviolet Induced Visible Fluorescence: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens with Baader UV/IR Cut Filter, Nichia NCSU033A UV-LED with Baader UV-Pass Filter, 10.0 s @ f/16 ISO 1600.
Attached Image: Verticordia_pityrhops_2_UVIVFL.jpg
Image Reference: DO63875

Reference:
George (Berndt), E.A. and Pieroni, M. Verticordia, the turner of hearts, University of Western Australia Press, 2002, p. 208

Published 12 January 2018

#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 21:36

Dave, it's nice to see you posting these interesting Australian flowers again. :D

The unopened flower looks like a little rock nestled in feathers. Quite charming.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 DaveO

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 22:41

Thanks Andrea,

I have been taking the images just haven't got around to posting for some time. Verticordias are now replacing eremophilas as desirable garden plants. They are becoming more available in local nurseries as grafted plants, there are still many challenges to grow them outside their native range in Western Australia. We also managed to find a copy of the Verticordia book, long out of print, which is a wonderful resource. Their common name is Featherflowers for obvious reasons. The most recent review was in Australian Plants, Volume 29, no. 232, Spring 2017, Australian Plants Society NSW Ltd.

Look out for more verticordia posts.