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Article: Reflected UV Imaging for Forensics Applications


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#1 Andrea B.

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 00:32

Added Later: This is not a scientific, peer-reviewed paper published in a known journal. It has some interesting photographs, so I have linked it.
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Reflected Ultraviolet Imaging for Forensics Applications
by Dr. Austin Richards
Adjunct Professor, Brooks Institute of Photography Partner, Oculus Photonics, Santa Barbara, CA Senior Research Scientist, FLIR Commercial Systems
Austin@uvcorder.com +1-805-284-5757
Updated 3/28/10

Very interesting !!

Right at the beginning Dr. Richards notes that you do not necessarily need a quartz lens for UV imaging, as we all know here.
And there's a nice little history of the transition from film to digital imaging in the UV where Dr. Richards observes that at first folks didn't realize their UV-pass filters were leaking IR.

Some nice forensic photos including bite marks. Not sure I would want to try to set up a bite test myself. :D

Paper also includes Dr. Richards attempt to measure his Fuji-S3-UVIR. He wasn't happy with his results.

LINK: https://www.google.c...BDrrd3QWumKQU9w
Andrea G. Blum
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#2 Andy Perrin

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 05:11

It is interesting, but this can't be a real paper (in the sense of having passed peer review). There were no references at the end, and the tone was informal. I think it must be meant as an article for a magazine, perhaps, rather than a journal. At any rate, the information seems consistent with what I've read here from you guys. I wonder if there are any of these UVB-capable "Sirchie scopes" floating around...?

Edited for tone.

Edited by Andy Perrin, 11 January 2016 - 05:37.


#3 Bill De Jager

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 06:22

That's a classic one, Andrea. Thanks for posting it! I especially like figure 8 on page 11, which among other things shows window glass blocking much more UV at shorter wavelengths.
Studying the botany and plant geography of California and western North America for almost 50 years.

#4 nfoto

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 09:02

The contribution was an info-commercial of historical interest only. Not eligible for any serious peer-review journal of course. The only tidbit of significance was the observation that much digital "UV" in reality was destroyed by IR contamination, a fact this community is well aware of :D

#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 14:34

You guys are correct. So I must label my post accordingly. Apologies for not doing that in the first place. Sometimes I pay less attention than I should. :D I added a bold remark to the post and relabeled the title with "Article" which should suffice to warn all that this is not a rigorous write-up.**

I linked it because of the photographs which were interesting. Those bite marks! Not something we can easily set up in order to practice our forensic UV photography.

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** I note, in passing, that Bjørn and I from time to time have noted more than one non-rigorous experiment in peer-reviewed, scientific papers involving UV photography. As Bjørn noted once: Most scientists are not photographers.

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Andy, there are UV scopes to be found "out there". An early member we had here owned one. I don't recall the details. We can just use our converted cams in Live View to achieve a similar result - although good illumination is required. I recall Bjørn prowling around the Mohave looking at stuff with his Lumix in Live View.
Andrea G. Blum
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#6 Shane

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 17:04

On a side note - I have corresponded with Austin Richards many time over the last ten years and was surprised to learn about his "other" life as Dr Megavolt. Google it for some entertainment.

#7 Bill De Jager

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 03:42

View Postnfoto, on 11 January 2016 - 09:02, said:

The contribution was an info-commercial of historical interest only. Not eligible for any serious peer-review journal of course. The only tidbit of significance was the observation that much digital "UV" in reality was destroyed by IR contamination, a fact this community is well aware of :D

There's no question that this article is in no way comparable to a peer-reviewed article in terms of rigor or authority, but for people starting out in UV it *is* informative regarding some basics. When I ran into it years ago I learned (what were for me at the time) some new things. Thus, it is useful for a certain audience. Yes, the informercial aspects are irritating.
Studying the botany and plant geography of California and western North America for almost 50 years.



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