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Hesperis matronalis [Dame's Rocket]: A UV Variant Example


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#1 Andrea B.

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 16:33

Blum, A.G. (2013) A UV Variant Example of Hesperis matronalis L. (Brassicaceae) Dame's Rocket. Flowers photographed in ultraviolet and visible light. http://www.ultraviol...ariant-example/

Seal Cove, Maine, USA
17 July 2012
Wildflower

Comment:
Rørslett (2013) first showed Hesperis matronalis in ultraviolet(1). Here is another example found growing along a rocky shore on Mount Desert Island. The pink flowers in this specimen show the same UV-absorbing petals with UV-dark center and throat as in Rørslett's pink flowers, but the white flowers are quite a bit brighter in UV and seem to have a smaller UV-dark central area.
Introduced to North America and often cultivated in the garden, Dames' Rocket has become an invasive in many states.

Reference:
1. Rørslett, B. 2012. Hesperis matronalis L. (Brassicaceae). Dame's Rocket. Flowers photographed in visible and ultraviolet light. http://www.ultraviol...s-dames-rocket/
2. Dame's Rocket, Alien Plant Working Group, Plant Conservation Alliance, Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C.
Attached Image: wgwlink.gif


Equipment [Nikon D300-broadband + Carl Zeiss 60mm f/4.0 UV-Planar]

Visible Light [f/11 for 1/60" @ ISO 200 with onboard Flash and Baader UVIR-Block Filter]
Click the photo to view at 1200 pixel width.
Attached Image: hesperisMatronalisVisFlash_071712sealCoveMdiME_28826pnRes.jpg

Ultraviolet Light [f/11 for 1/60" @ ISO 320 with SB-14 UV-modified Flash and Baader UV-Pass Filter]
Click the photo to view at 1200 pixel width.
Attached Image: hesperisMatronalisUVBaadSB14_071712sealCoveMdiME_28831pnRes.jpg
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#2 nfoto

    Former Fierce Bear of the North

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 13:08

Interestingly, the albino flowers are UV-different from the normal coloured ones. I wonder how widespread this UV response is.

The petals of the normal flowers apparently have much larger patches of conical cells on their upper surface.

#3 Andrea B.

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 18:33

It's always a bit difficult to determine the conical cells because one really needs to use a raking light. I think the white flowers were too much facing the light to be able to see conical cells. Also a closer-up would have been better for seeing them methinks.

I've seen this variation in UV absorbtion between blue and white flowers in some Anemone blanda - not yet posted. But you have seen it way back when I posted it on NG. I'll try to get that posted later this evening.

We need either a tag or a "special" section for this phenomenon so that we can correlate later.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.