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TODAYS FLOWERS

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#1 photoni

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 16:28

all the photos were taken with Sony A7 f.s. + Nikkor-H 50 f:2 - @ f:8

standard vision (BG39) and UV (BG39+BG25)

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#2 photoni

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 16:32

the first with red filter A25 - 580nm
the second without filters
the third with BG39
the fourth with BG39 + BG25

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#3 UlfW

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 16:44

These were an interesting set of images using different filter combinations.

A comment about your A25 filter.
The A25 designation is originally from the Wratten gelatin sheet filter way of naming.
A25 has been used for many different filter brands with glass filters.
I think the cut on wavelength normally is closer to 590-595nm but might be wrong about that

590nm red filters are often used for Goldie style landscape IR-photography with converted cameras.
https://www.google.c...chrome&ie=UTF-8

Well done Toni!
Ulf Wilhelmson
Curious and trying to see the invisible.

#4 Stefano

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 16:49

Very interesting images.

#5 photoni

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 18:34

View PostUlfW, on 12 July 2021 - 16:44, said:

These were an interesting set of images using different filter combinations.

A comment about your A25 filter.
The A25 designation is originally from the Wratten gelatin sheet filter way of naming.
A25 has been used for many different filter brands with glass filters.
I think the cut on wavelength normally is closer to 590-595nm but might be wrong about that

590nm red filters are often used for Goldie style landscape IR-photography with converted cameras.
https://www.google.c...chrome&ie=UTF-8

Well done Toni!


Thanks Ulf W
the red filter is a glass that I bought as a student 48 years ago with my first reflex.
it is branded Vivitar R 25A I used it with black and white photographic film.
I also have Kodak Wratten filters in 10x10 cm sheets N ° 87 and 87C BLACK they produce great BW photos but they are problematic to use

#6 colinbm

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 21:47

These are fantastic Toni, & the flowers are all beautiful.