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Lucanus servus [Stag beetle] in reflected UV, visible and IR

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#1 JMC

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Posted 15 June 2021 - 10:33

Crowther, J.M. (2021) Lucanus servus L. (Lucanidae) Stag Beetle. Photographs in visible, ultraviolet and infrared light.

Synonyms:
  • Lucanus scapulodonta Weinreich, 1963
  • Scarabaeus cervus Linnaeus, 1758
  • Scarabaeus tridentatus Linnaeus, 1758 (partim.)
Reference:
Wikipedia (15 June 2021) Lucanus servus. Wikimedia Foundation, San Francisco, CA.

Comment:
This male Stag Beetle was found dead (having flown into a window). Photographed in reflected UV in sunlight, using a UV converted Nikon D810 (converted by Advanced Camera Services Ltd) and using a Rayfact 105mm UV lens. ISO1000, f32, and 6s exposure. A Schott s8612 1mm was also used on the front the lens. Whitebalanced in Darktable. Cropped and reduced in resolution for sharing. A camera phone visible light shot is also shown for comparison.

Firstly, reflected UV.
Attached Image: DSC_8776mod small.jpg

And, in visible light.
Attached Image: 20210615_110336 small.jpg

Stupidly I took it at f32 without cleaning the sensor first. So, spent 20 mins cleaning the image.....

EDIT - as an after thought I went back out and did one in IR. Canon EOS 5DSR multispectral, Rayfact 105mm f22, Hoya R72. Whitebalanced in Darktable. Cropped and reduced in resolution for sharing. Slightly different positioning but lighting the same.
Attached Image: 1R4A0453mod small.jpg
Jonathan M. Crowther

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#2 Stefano

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Posted 15 June 2021 - 10:48

I have one too. The "eyes" (I'm not sure) fluoresce blue under UV.

#3 nfoto

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Posted 15 June 2021 - 12:58

Nice find. I would suggest using focus stacking for this 'stationary* insect .. that negates the use of very small apertures. With the UV-Nikkor/Rayfact I normally use f/4.5-f/5.6 at most..

#4 JMC

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Posted 15 June 2021 - 14:21

Yeah, fully agree Birna. I would do if I had a more stable tripod (and some more time).
Jonathan M. Crowther

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#5 nfoto

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Posted 15 June 2021 - 16:51

Use a table and put everything there. No tripod.

#6 Andrea B.

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 22:01

The antlers of that beetle in IR are quite interesting. I'm glad you went back out for the IR version.

I'm going to give you a header and a reference. :wink: :bee:

Just read that these beetles only live a few weeks. So maybe yours just up and died?

This is a magnificent beetle, for sure !!
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#7 JMC

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Posted 18 June 2021 - 08:50

Thanks Andrea. Could be that it just died, but it was found directly outside a window and they do fly into them. Yes, the IR image was a bit of an afterthought, but I'm certainly glad I went back and did it.

Birna, yes, I'd love to spend more time doing macro work with a proper setup. For me though, I tend to take images in between work when i have a few minutes spare. I have however kept this one, and may return to it later when I can set up something a bit better.
Jonathan M. Crowther

http://jmcscientificconsulting.com