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Amauriopsis dissecta [Ragleaf Bahia]

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#1 Andrea B.

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Posted 14 June 2021 - 06:35

Blum, A.G. (2021) Amauriopsis dissects (A. Gray) Rydb. (Asteraceae) Ragleaf Bahia. Flowers photographed in ultraviolet and visible light. https://www.ultravio...-ragleaf-bahia/

La Tienda, Eldorado at Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
06 Oct 2020
Wildflower

Synonyms:
  • Hymenothrix dissecta (A. Gray) Rydb.
    This is, I think, the current proper name of the flower
    even though it is still extensively listed as Amauriopsis dissecta.

  • Amauria dissecta A.Gray
  • Bahia chrysanthemoides (A.Gray) A.Gray
  • Bahia dissecta (A.Gray) Britton
  • Eriophyllum chrysanthemodes (A.Gray) Kuntze
  • Villanova chrysanthemoides A.Gray
Other Common Names:
  • Bahia
  • Ragged Leaf Bahia
  • Sunray Daisy
.
Comment:
This Bahia is a late summer and autumn bloomer which was still producing flowers in early October even though our frosts had begun. The disk flowers are UV-dark. The notched rays, which are pistillate flowers, show some UV-dark veining that is more prominent on the abaxial side.

References:
1. SEINet Arizona-New Mexico Chapter (acc 14 Jun 2021) Amauriopsis dissecta.
This is a southwestern biodiversity organization making use of the Symbiota portal software.
2. Wildflowers of New Mexico (acc 14 Jun 2021) Amauriopsis dissecta.
Website published and maintained by George Oxford Miller.
3. Southwest Colorado Wildflowers (acc 14 Jun 2021) Amauriopsis dissecta.
Website published and maintained by Al Schneider and hosted by Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory.
4. Allred, Kelly W., Jercinovic, Eugene M., Ivey, Robert DeWitt (2021) Flora Neomexicana III: An Illustrated Identification Manual, Second Edition, Part 2, Hymenothrix Key, page 163. Print on demand at lulu.com.


Equipment [Nikon D610-broadband + UV-capable Lens]
Forgot to make note of the lens used! Now I can't remember. Oh well.


Visible Light [f/11 for 1/1.6" @ ISO-200 in ambient Skylight with Baader UVIR-Block Filter]
Attached Image: amauriopsisDissecta_vis_ambient_20201006laTienda_22420pnRes.jpg


Ultraviolet Light [f/11 for 20" @ ISO-200 with SB-14 UV-modified Flash and BaaderU UV-Pass Filter]
Three flashes were fired in the 20 second interval.
Attached Image: amauriopsisDissecta_uvBaad_sb14_20201006laTienda_22434pnRes.jpg


Ultraviolet Light
The pollen is UV-bright. Not the best photo, but I was intrigued by how the stigmas picked up the dots of pollen as they pushed up through the fused anthers.
Attached Image: amauriopsisDissecta_uvBaad_sb14_20201006laTienda_22361pn01.jpg


Ultraviolet Light [f/11 for 15" @ ISO-200 with SB-14 UV-modified Flash and BaaderU UV-Pass Filter]
Twp flashes were fired in the 15 second interval.
The back of the flower shows some false blue at the base of the rays.
Attached Image: amauriopsisDissectaAbaxial_uvBaad_sb14_20201006laTienda_22461pn01.jpg
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#2 Andy Perrin

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Posted 14 June 2021 - 09:42

The back of that one is amazing.

#3 Adrian

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Posted 14 June 2021 - 10:10

Great images Andrea!
Adrian Davies
www.imagingtheinvisible.com

#4 Andrea B.

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Posted 14 June 2021 - 16:28

Thank you!

The first two photos look good I think.
The third one shows some shutter shock, but I wanted to post the pollen on the stigmas.

The black dots on the underside of the Bahia rays are some kind of gland, I think.
Those aren't dirt specks even though the involucre has picked up quite a lot of debris out here in the windy west.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.