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UVC LEDs YouTube Video

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#1 colinbm

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Posted 17 February 2021 - 14:28

A recent YouTube video on current UVC LEDs.

https://www.youtube....=SDGElectronics

#2 Andy Perrin

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Posted 17 February 2021 - 16:22

Interesting, although I feel like he needs a different spectroscopy setup!

#3 Stefano

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Posted 17 February 2021 - 23:43

Nice video. UVC LEDs are becoming more and more common.

#4 dabateman

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 04:42

Its hard to say if he has UVC based on his tests with an apple, not a green banana and the lack of any deep peak. Either his spectrometer isn't sensitive at 265nm or has some bk glass blocking less than 300nm or his fibers are cheap glass.
But he might just have junk for leds. They were really cheap, after all.
After watching the video all I learned is that even if I assume these to be true 265nm leds, the visible leakage isn't any advantage over a Mercury bulb.

#5 UlfW

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 07:15

The optical output is useless for our needs of illumination. The most powerful LED he tested was supposed to deliver less than 20mW.

However he used an interesting hotplate for mounting them on a carrier board:
https://www.google.c...chrome&ie=UTF-8
Ulf Wilhelmson
Curious and trying to see the invisible.

#6 colinbm

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 07:52

Yes Ulf, that caught my eye too.
The plates are made for each LED part number & he has had to mount them himself ?

#7 UlfW

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 08:12

He bought separate LED components and mounted them on suitable metal PCBs with footprint patterns matching the LED cases.
Power LEDs are tiny for the thermal power they must dissipate.
They must be mounted on a metal-type carrier PCB that must be mounted on a heatsink or cooling device big enough to remove the generated thermal losses.

I am considering buying a hotplate like this for minor general electronics rework. I might even use it some day to mount LEDs.

Edited by UlfW, 18 February 2021 - 08:13.

Ulf Wilhelmson
Curious and trying to see the invisible.