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Interesting paper about surface structures in flowers and UV

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#1 UlfW

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Posted 08 January 2021 - 08:08

https://www.beilstei...-4286-10-45.pdf
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#2 colinbm

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Posted 08 January 2021 - 08:23

Structural Colour is fascinating....

#3 Andy Perrin

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Posted 08 January 2021 - 15:35

That’s an interesting result. The replicas didn’t get nearly as dark as the originals, so obviously this is some combination of pigment and structural color, not just structure.

Also interesting was the Erodium manescavii flower which is the first flower I’ve ever seen that has the UV bullseye but is not yellow. Has this flower been imaged on the board before?

Edit after seeing DaveO's comment: wow, I forgot you posted that! And that I'd seen it before...um, time to lay off the booze.

Edited by Andy Perrin, 09 January 2021 - 01:29.


#4 DaveO

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Posted 08 January 2021 - 23:31

Been there, done that

https://www.ultravio...__fromsearch__1

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#5 UlfW

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Posted 09 January 2021 - 12:23

DaveO, It was interesting the first time I read it too, before completely forgetting your post.
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#6 Andrea B.

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Posted Yesterday, 19:45

Birna and I have certainly seen some kind of structural effect in the UV reflectivity of floral subjects. The best examples we saw were when we were photographing the poppies in the US deserts (Arizona, IIRC). They are deep black in UV but show these interesting UV-bright streaks and flashes as they toss about in the wind. Other flowers like spring blooming crocus also show this. We have been calling it "iridescence" and remark on it often in floral topics.

I'm quite sure we aren't the only UV floral photogs who have observed this. :grin:

The explanations in Nanotechnology paper are quite interesting. That is not the first paper to discuss structural color, but their work with the scanning electron microscope really does serve to "prove" (as they put it) how the structural color actually works. This is one of the papers I'm going to print out and study in depth.

Thank you for the link, Ulf.



I think I should have somewhere here on UVP a small board just to collect links to papers. We have a lot of them now. I had been trying to mark such references with a title header like [Article] or [Paper] in the References section. Maybe I should continue that. (I need more hands !!!)



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#7 Stefano

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Posted Yesterday, 19:52

Andrea, that's interesting. I would love to have such a flower to record a video of it.

#8 Andrea B.

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Posted Yesterday, 20:05

In the spring, Italy has lots of blooming red poppies. I saw these around the colosseum in Rome, which I am sure is not the only location in Italy where they bloom. I also saw them along railroad tracks. They were *beauriful*. So in the spring, start looking. Also check with florists and garden plant stores in the spring for "Iceland" poppies (yellow, orange, pink) which is a popular spring garden flower here which I'll bet you can also get.

Birna has a video of the desert poppy in UV. I'll see if we can figure out how to link it. Don't know if she is available right now, but I'll check.
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#9 Stefano

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Posted Yesterday, 20:10

I saw red poppies occasionally in my area. They aren't very common, but they do grow. Will give a try if I can.

#10 Andy Perrin

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Posted Yesterday, 22:23

All I know is that they have them in Belgium (because of the poem).

#11 dabateman

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Posted Yesterday, 23:04

You can order the opium variety from Washington and California states. I have seen them in medicinal catalogs. The seeds, dried flowers or live plants.