• Ultraviolet Photography
  •  

A Flower I Don't Know

33 replies to this topic

#1 Cadmium

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 3,704 posts

Posted 17 July 2020 - 05:01

This little flower measures about 12mm-15mm in diameter when fully open. It is new to my yard as far as I know. I don't know what it is.
It is a little like a miniature dandelion.
I have two sets of shots, same kind of flower, but two different flowers. The first is shot more in the sun and is more open, the second is shot more in the shade and is more closed
Note the swirled color on the back of the petals that are not opened, in the UV and BUG shots in set #1 (upper right).
Nikon D7000 UVIR, UV-Nikkor 105mm.

Set #1
Visual (Schott BG38)
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_visual_1_1200.jpg

UV (Hoya U-360 2mm + Schott S8612 2mm)
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_UV_1_1200.jpg

BUG (Schott UG5 1.5mm + S8612 2mm)
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_BUG_1_1200.jpg

Side by side
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_1_all_3_1920.jpg

Set #2
Visual (Schott BG38)
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_visual_2_1200.jpg

UV (Hoya U-360 2mm + Schott S8612 2mm)
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_UVl_2_1200.jpg

BUG (Schott UG5 1.5mm + S8612 2mm)
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_BUG_2_1200.jpg

IR (Schott RG9)
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_IR_RG9_2_1200.jpg

Side by side
Attached Image: Flower_unknown_2_4_Shots_1920.jpg

Edited by Cadmium, 17 July 2020 - 05:06.


#2 dabateman

    Da Bateman

  • Members+G
  • 1,986 posts
  • Location: Maryland

Posted 17 July 2020 - 05:13

These look great. It must be a type of dandelion. I think I remember Birna saying there are 100s of different types of just dandelions.
I think I like the suttle accent of the green tips better than the full out in the open green center.

#3 Cadmium

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 3,704 posts

Posted 17 July 2020 - 05:36

Thanks! :smile:
I have to say, this UV-Nikkor 105mm, is addicting. It is so perfect for flowers, the distance, and put the extension tube on it (Nikon PN-11) it to get closer shots.
Sharp too.
Please consider there was a lot of gentle but relentless wind today. The answer is blowing in the wind they say.

Edited by Cadmium, 17 July 2020 - 15:16.


#4 Andy Perrin

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 3,256 posts
  • Location: United States

Posted 17 July 2020 - 05:39

It looks more like hawkweed to me (which are related to dandelions, I think?).

#5 Bernard Foot

    Bernard Foot

  • Members+G
  • 353 posts
  • Location: UK

Posted 17 July 2020 - 07:59

I would guess a crepis dandelion (which I think covers Hawkweed/Hawks-beard).

I envy you for the UV-Nik !
Bernard Foot

#6 Adrian

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 160 posts
  • Location: Ashtead, Surrey, UK

Posted 17 July 2020 - 08:39

Yes, a Hawkbit I think: Leontodon sp.
Adrian Davies
www.imagingtheinvisible.com

#7 nfoto

    Former Fierce Bear of the North

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 2,740 posts
  • Location: Sørumsand, Norway

Posted 17 July 2020 - 14:39

Dandelions never have branched stems.

As to the ID, there are simply too many genera in this family to make an educated guess. Showing the entire plant and foliage alwways is required in rder to arrive at an ID.

That being said, nice photos which also show what the UV-Nikkor can deliver. It certainly is "addictive" for UV aficionados.

#8 Stefano

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 894 posts
  • Location: Italy

Posted 17 July 2020 - 15:08

I too have similar branched flowers. I wonder if DNA is sometimes the only option to identify a species.

#9 Cadmium

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 3,704 posts

Posted 17 July 2020 - 15:09

Maybe this will help. Cloudy today, but this should give an idea of the entire plant.
There is another plant, which has a similar slightly larger flower, but it has a broad leafy ground base (kind of like a dandelion would have), but the flower I show above
doesn't have a broad leafy ground base, it just has the leaves on the stem.
Take a look and compare, see what you think:

The flower/plant above.
Attached Image: Flower_Unkown_Visual_Full_1280.jpg

The other flower plant with broad leafy ground base (not in any of the photos above, just for comparison).
Attached Image: Other_Flower_Unknown_1080H.jpg

#10 Andy Perrin

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 3,256 posts
  • Location: United States

Posted 17 July 2020 - 15:48

Well, they have branched stems for sure. So not-dandelions.

#11 nfoto

    Former Fierce Bear of the North

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 2,740 posts
  • Location: Sørumsand, Norway

Posted 17 July 2020 - 15:54

Leontoodon, Picris, Hieracium, Crepis, Scorzonera, .... the list goes on and on. Use Flora of North America which is an eFlora to key out the relevant options.

#12 Stefano

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 894 posts
  • Location: Italy

Posted 17 July 2020 - 16:06

View Postnfoto, on 17 July 2020 - 15:54, said:

Leontoodon, Picris, Hieracium, Crepis, Scorzonera, .... the list goes on and on.
I looked at images of all the species you cited. They are very similar indeed. That's very confusing... maybe even a trained eye has trouble distinguishing them.

#13 nfoto

    Former Fierce Bear of the North

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 2,740 posts
  • Location: Sørumsand, Norway

Posted 17 July 2020 - 16:28

They are well delineated as far as Asteracean genera go. However, this family *is* the biggest of them all with 25K + species. Use the Flora keys.

#14 Cadmium

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 3,704 posts

Posted 17 July 2020 - 16:42

Thanks.
As I said, the flower has no leaves at the base on the ground. I see a lot like that, but not this one.

#15 Bill De Jager

    Member

  • Members
  • 265 posts
  • Location: Northern California, USA

Posted 17 July 2020 - 18:35

If it helps any, this plant appears to be in the Cichorieae tribe within the Asteraceae. That narrows things down quite a bit but still leaves many genera and thousands of species as possibilities.

#16 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,011 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 17 July 2020 - 20:16

The rays, growth habit and basal leaves indicate a Crepis species. Several Crepis species grow in your county, Cadmium. I will key this later after I finish my remaining tax return.
Note that the basal leaves wrap around the stem and have "ears", extensions at the stem end.

Added: sorry forgot to add.....

.....indicate a Crepis or a Hieracium species.


I was looking at the whole plant photos and not sure which corresponds to what.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#17 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,011 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 17 July 2020 - 20:31

Wait a sec. I think I got confused.
For the flower you photographed in UV, which of the photos in Post #9 correspond to it.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#18 Cadmium

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 3,704 posts

Posted 17 July 2020 - 20:44

Hi Andrea, The flower I photographed is the one that has no base/ground leaves, this one:
https://www.ultravio...-1594998383.jpg

#19 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,011 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 17 July 2020 - 22:38

The flower has only one series of phyllaries, so it is not a Hawkweed (Hieracium species).
So I have at this point either Crepis or Picris ***IF*** the seeds are not beaked.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#20 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 8,011 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 17 July 2020 - 23:25

I suggest Crepis setosa for further investigation.

Here is a reference link from Oregon State University: https://oregonstate....sbeard_page.htm

The plant on the left is C. setosa.
Scroll down to see photos #3 and #4 on the left. They show the clasping, "eared" leaf which looks just like in your photo.

In this OSU reference, the poster refers to two rows of phyllaries on C. setosa under the last photo on the left.
I interpreted your flower as having one row of phyllaries and some underlying calyculi.
It is probably la même différence.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.