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Simple flower

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#1 KaJashey

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 02:03

I'm looking for help identifying this flower. I suspect it is something planted and not wild.

Edit: a facebook friend jumped in with Centaurea Cyanus, commonly known as cornflower or bachelor's button.

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  • Attached Image: Flower-visible.jpg
  • Attached Image: Flower-UVCC.jpg

Edited by KaJashey, 02 June 2020 - 03:17.


#2 nfoto

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 09:52

Centaurea cyanus is correct. Although it occurs natively in most of Europe as an agricultural weed, today one often sees it in seed mixtures for road verges or gardens (to make a "flower meadow").

#3 Bernard Foot

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 14:51

In case you're not aware, there is a great site to help you identify plants at https://identify.pla...ist/?view=query .

You can throw pictures of flowers and leaves (among other things) at it and it gives you weighted suggestions as to what the plant is. It's better if you have photos of both the flowers and the leaves, but can work if you just have a flower. I gave it your photo, and it came up with Cyanus segetum Hill (Garden Cornflower) as the most likely match. It certainly looks like yours - not being a botanist I don't know what the relationship of this to Centaurea cyanus is.

Edited by Bernard Foot, 02 June 2020 - 14:52.

Bernard Foot

#4 nfoto

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 21:21

It's the same species, just with different names as they are put into different genera.

By the way, it's a very old trick by taxonomical botanists to "get rid of the original author" when a genus is split. By naming the new genus using the specific epithet of the "new" type species, they can attach their own author name directly without having the old author in brackets.

Thus, in the case of the cornflower, described by Linnaeus as Centaurea cyanus L., if you make the new genus name to be Cyanus, you get rid of Linneaus because the Botanical Ccode says you cannot have genus and species names the same (this is for plants). So the new scientific name becomes Cyanus segetum Hill. instead. Smart move? You avoid the author combination "(L.)Hill." and reign supreme on your own.

Well, the practice has rightfully fallen into disregard and it might even not be allowed any more. Not sure about the latter, but it stands to reason.

#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 16:21

Edit: a facebook friend jumped in with Centaurea cyanus, commonly known as cornflower or bachelor's button.

That's correct.

It has a nice UV-dark bullseye. Cool!

If you like, you could make an entry in the section UV Cultivars: Garden & Decorative Flora
The topic title would be Centaurea cyanus [Cornflower]. The formatting is not difficult to do. Just follow other entries in that section. I'll help out by making any minor edits which are needed.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.