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[UV] In a Different Light

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#1 DaveO

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 03:44

Welcome to my gallery. It is my delight, especially in our Spring in Australia, to wander through our bush and photograph our Australian native wildflowers, especially terrestrial orchids. Last year I had an exhibition at a small local gallery in Central Victoria entitled In a Different Light with my photographs of our Australian native wildflowers in UV. This was the image I chose for publicity for the exhibition.

Attached Image: Diuris_chryseopsis_UV_2.jpg


Diuris chryseopsis Golden Moths Orchid

#2 colinbm

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 04:49

Congratulations Dave you are doing great works.

#3 DaveO

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 07:29

Thanks Col,

I still get a kick out of seeing stuff that nobody else has ever seen, because we live on the other side of the world.

Cheers,

Dave

#4 nfoto

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 08:16

View PostDaveO, on 20 March 2020 - 07:29, said:

--- I still get a kick out of seeing stuff that nobody else has ever seen, because we live on the other side of the world. ---

That is the enchantment of dealing with the "invisible". We are all pioneers and able to explore a new world.

A very nice picture, by the way

#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 17:12

Yes, I love this unusual yellow orchid. (See comment in botanical section.)


** Last year I had an exhibition at a small local gallery in Central Victoria entitled In a Different Light with my photographs of our Australian native wildflowers in UV.

Congratulations on having a gallery exhibition, Dave. Did it take a lot of work to prepare for it? Did you print your photos yourself or send them to a commercial printer?
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#6 Andy Perrin

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 17:34

I think this is a great capture and I see why you chose it for your exhibition. Has it ever been established why so many visible-yellow flowers have UV bullseye patterns?

#7 DaveO

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 00:19

Here's how my exhibition appeared in the local paper :

Attached Image: UV Exhibition TT e.jpg

#8 Stefano

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 00:39

View PostAndy Perrin, on 20 March 2020 - 17:34, said:

I think this is a great capture and I see why you chose it for your exhibition. Has it ever been established why so many visible-yellow flowers have UV bullseye patterns?
I find even more interesting that visible-yellow flowers are very often UV-yellow (sometimes UV-black). For example, why (to my knowledge) there aren't any visible-yellow, UV-blue flowers?

#9 Andy Perrin

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 00:48

Stefano, that's almost certainly a coincidence of the choice of Bayer dyes and how they behave in UV. It's not a property of the external world, it's determined by our camera's construction. (If you prefer BGR photos like OlDoinyo does, then they are not yellow.)

Edited by Andy Perrin, 21 March 2020 - 00:48.


#10 Stefano

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 00:48

[a bit off-topic] I found this discussion about UV-yellow: https://www.ultravio...__fromsearch__1

Referring to the last post, I have a yellow sweatshirt (or something similar) that is also UV-yellow.

#11 Stefano

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 00:53

View PostAndy Perrin, on 21 March 2020 - 00:48, said:

Stefano, that's almost certainly a coincidence of the choice of Bayer dyes and how they behave in UV. It's not a property of the external world, it's determined by our camera's construction. (If you prefer BGR photos like OlDoinyo does, then they are not yellow.)
True, it is a coincidence, but colors (even in UV) have a meaning. Most yellow flowers reflect [infrared], red, green (hence the yellow color), absorb blue (and violet), absorb longwave UV (~380-400 nm) and have a bump around 360 nm, which gives them their UV-yellow color. I find this interesting.

Edited by Stefano, 21 March 2020 - 00:53.


#12 Andrea B.

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 19:28

Dave, thanks for posting the write up in the local newspaper. I'm always so happy to see one of our members enjoy their photographic success! Keep up the good work.



Stefano, you might want to read up on the pigments which give flowers their color. See also https://www.ultravio...-chittka-paper/

I once started making a chart of our posted flowers which showed their colour together with their false colour.
<link soon>

Andrea G. Blum
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#13 DaveO

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 22:58

This is a link to a paper with spectra of flower petals - if only
how to colour a flower
http://rspb.royalsoc...3/1830/20160429