• Ultraviolet Photography
  •  

Kiwi UVIVF

Fluorescence
11 replies to this topic

#1 Toby

    Member

  • Members
  • 10 posts

Posted 12 February 2020 - 22:43

Shot at F/10 using a minolta 100mm macro ISO 640 @ 1.3" on sony a7iii
Attached Image: TS_03951-Edit.jpg

#2 Stefano

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location: Italy

Posted 12 February 2020 - 22:46

Chlorophyll is probably the responsible for the red glow. It fluoresces deep red.

#3 Toby

    Member

  • Members
  • 10 posts

Posted 12 February 2020 - 22:58

View PostStefano, on 12 February 2020 - 22:46, said:

Chlorophyll is probably the responsible for the red glow. It fluoresces deep red.

I agree that it could be chlorophyll, though it definitely seemed brighter than other chlorophyll containing plant parts like leaves. When I was doing this test I bought a bunch of fruit and the kiwi was by far the brightest.

#4 nfoto

    Former Fierce Bear of the North

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 3,179 posts
  • Location: Sørumsand, Norway

Posted 12 February 2020 - 23:03

Lots of stuff other than chlorophyll can appear with a red fluorescence. Try eggs -- no chlorophyll there ...

#5 Toby

    Member

  • Members
  • 10 posts

Posted 12 February 2020 - 23:07

View Postnfoto, on 12 February 2020 - 23:03, said:

Lots of stuff other than chlorophyll can appear with a red fluorescence. Try eggs -- no chlorophyll there ...

That would make more sense, since it seems strange that there would be significant photosynthetic ability on the inside of a fruit.

#6 Stefano

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location: Italy

Posted 12 February 2020 - 23:19

View Postnfoto, on 12 February 2020 - 23:03, said:

Lots of stuff other than chlorophyll can appear with a red fluorescence. Try eggs -- no chlorophyll there ...
Yes, eggs are very cool under UV. I tried it once. The chemical that does this is protoporphyrin IX (I did a quick research). Why a precursor oh haemoglobin should be found inside a kiwi? Also, the green color of this fruit suggests me of chlorophyll, even if it doesn't make a lot of sense. Chlorophyll is present also in unusual parts of a plant, even though green fruits are not very common.

#7 nfoto

    Former Fierce Bear of the North

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 3,179 posts
  • Location: Sørumsand, Norway

Posted 12 February 2020 - 23:25

Eggs were just an example that sprung to mind....

#8 Stefano

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location: Italy

Posted 12 February 2020 - 23:27

View Postnfoto, on 12 February 2020 - 23:25, said:

Eggs were just an example that sprung to mind....
Yes, of course you didn't mean that it was the same compound found in eggs. I may have given this idea with my answer.

#9 Mark

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 566 posts
  • Location: Massachusetts, USA

Posted 13 February 2020 - 00:43

Excellent detail Toby. And a belated welcome to the boards here, btw. I also shot a kiwi fruit some time ago [https://www.ultravio...post__p__14370] - I'm happy to see our results are quite similar (this at least helps me to feel confident that I've done something right! :wink:

#10 Cadmium

    Member

  • Members+G
  • 4,167 posts

Posted 13 February 2020 - 03:30

Very nice indeed!

#11 dabateman

    Da Bateman

  • Members+G
  • 2,767 posts
  • Location: Maryland

Posted 13 February 2020 - 05:28

Great kiwi image.
The kiwi berries are similar. I shot some but never posted.
Similarly never posted that English cucumber seem to so far be one of the brightest vegetables.


#12 Mark

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 566 posts
  • Location: Massachusetts, USA

Posted 13 February 2020 - 23:52

@dabateman: You should definitely post your English cuke pics! I shot a regular (?) cucumber a while ago [link] - I'd like to see how the English variety compares...