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Vitiligo in UVIVF

Fluorescence
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#1 Andy Broomé

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 04:20

I've had vitiligo for about 25 years. It's quite noticeable on the underside of my forearms, near my elbows.

I took a selfie using a Convoy S2+ with Hoya U340 on a full spectrum Sony A7, taking off my safety glasses and closing my eyes for the 2 second countdown timer, before putting them back on.

What was surprising (at least, to me) was that I also have it on my eyelids. In the visible spectrum, my eyelid vitiligo isn't visible at all, and my eyelids are not dark near the eyelashes, but really seemed to stand out under UVIVF (actually, UVIFSF, since I didn't put the hot mirror filter on).

Attached image is a 100% crop of my right eye, for reference:
Attached Image: DSC07761.jpg

#2 colinbm

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 04:35

Vitiligo is a loss of pigment.
Is it showing dark here because the UV is getting deeper down ?


Col



#3 Andy Broomé

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 05:00

View Postcolinbm, on 14 January 2020 - 04:35, said:

Vitiligo is a loss of pigment.
Is it showing dark here because the UV is getting deeper down ?
Honestly, no idea. My eyelids are uniform in skin colour (same colour as the rest of my face) in the visible. Not sure why the ends seem to be darker.

#4 Cadmium

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:43

Are you talking about the red areas?

#5 dabateman

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 14:30

View PostCadmium, on 14 January 2020 - 06:43, said:

Are you talking about the red areas?

No he is referring to that glowing white band accross his eye.
That may not be Vitiligo, but something different.


#6 Andy Broomé

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 16:21

View PostCadmium, on 14 January 2020 - 06:43, said:

Are you talking about the red areas?
I'm talking about my vitiligo (at the top of my eyelid) and the apparent redness lower down - both of which do not show up in the visible light.

#7 Mark

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 00:41

How interesting to find something new about yourself in this way. I suppose you may need to be extra careful in the sun (exposure to UV...) (?). If so, that would make this hobby potentially all the more hazardous for you, no!?

#8 Andy Broomé

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 01:53

View PostMark, on 16 January 2020 - 00:41, said:

How interesting to find something new about yourself in this way. I suppose you may need to be extra careful in the sun (exposure to UV...) (?). If so, that would make this hobby potentially all the more hazardous for you, no!?
In theory, no. For UVIVF, I always use my safety glasses, and I don't think my retracted eyelids are that exposed when my eyes are open. Plus I always use sunglasses when out in bright weather (whether I'm shooting or not) as I get headaches otherwise.

My main problem is the vitiligo on my forearms, which does burn easily, so I use a high SPF in the summer months.

#9 dabateman

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 06:36

Whats possible is the very most top layer of melanocytes has started to die on your eyelids. Reflected in the shallow penetration depth of the UV light. Then the live cells under that layer are visible.

I wonder, you may have found an early way to diagnose this disease. Can you also take a visible and IR photo of the same area?

I don't think there yet is a way to reverse the death of the pigment carrier cells. But intervention in areas where there is early detection may help in the future.

In my old lab someone was working with Pmel17, a functional amyloid protein that seemed to help the formation of pigment.


#10 Timber

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 20:54

I have vitiligo as well... posted about it like 5 years ago :P
https://www.ultravio...vitiligo-and-uv

#11 dabateman

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 21:40

Timber in that photo you look to me like you have a cat ear. Really interesting.

Has it been controlled, the vitiligo, not the cat ear?

Its an odd disease to have all of the melanin cells die out.