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Eremophila christopheri White Form [Dolomite Fuchsia Bush]

Fluorescence
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#1 DaveO

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Posted 13 January 2020 - 03:10

Oldfield, D. 2020. Eremophila christopheri white form F. Muell. (Scrophulariaceae) Dolomite Fuchsia Bush. Flowers photographed in visible and ultraviolet light. https://www.ultravio...__fromsearch__1

Maldon, Victoria, Australia
24 November 2019
Australian Native Wildflower as Garden Specimen

Synonyms:
Pholodia christophori Kraenzl.
Eremophila christophori F. Muell.
Bontia christopheri (F. Muell.) Kuntze
Eremophila christophorii Barlow

Comments:
Eremophila christopheri occurs in a band extending east north east from the Macdonnell Ranges west of Alice Springs in the southern part of the Northern Territory of Australia. The colour of the flowers can be white, pink or lilac.

Visible Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Metz 15 MS-1 flash, 1/200 s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV/IR Cut Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_christophorii_white_form_Vis.jpg
Image Reference: DO66484

Ultraviolet Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Nissin Di866 Mark II flash, 1/200s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV-Pass Filter.
Attached Image: Eremophila_christophorii_white_form_UV.jpg
Image Reference: DO66485

Ultraviolet Induced Visible Fluorescence: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens with Baader UV/IR Cut Filter, Nichia NCSU033A UV-LED with Baader UV-Pass Filter, 10.0 s @ f/16 ISO 1600.
Attached Image: Eremophila_christophorii_white_form_UVIVFL.jpg
Image Reference: DO66487

References:

Mueller, FJH von (1875). Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae 9 (77).

Chinnock, R.J. Eremophila and Allied Genera, Rosenberg, 2007, p. 457.

Published 13 January 2020

Edited by DaveO, 22 January 2020 - 08:45.


#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 23:03

Both the lilac form and the white form have the same UV reflectivity, it seems. But the fluorescence is different. Must be because of the different pigmentation, yes?
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 colinbm

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 05:30

Good photography as usual Dave.
Is that fuzz in the flowers 'mouth' a spiders web ?
Col

#4 DaveO

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 00:18

Andrea, If I had a lab I would do Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) which is a more recent version of paper chromatography and I'm pretty sure you would see multiple components in an aqueous extract of the flowers , some spots would absorb UV, some would fluoresce, some wouldn't care. I would not be surprised to find that one component was responsible for the UV absorption and another for the visible colour and either/both/neither for the fluorescence. The plants have had millions of years separated from the rest of the world to get it right.

Col, the 'fuzz' are usually called hairs and I think they help to make the pollinating insect brush against the parts of the flower (you can tell I'm not a botanist) which dispense and receive the pollen. These flowers all evolved in the presence of native Aussie pollinating insects, there goes another lifetime to sort it all out.

Dave

#5 colinbm

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 03:11

Thanks Dave