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Dotted loosestrife (Vis, UV, IRG, UVIVF, UVIIF, SWIR 1500-1600nm)

Fluorescence Infrared Multispectral SWIR
10 replies to this topic

#1 Andy Perrin

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 21:32

I believe this flower is yellow [dotted] loosestrife. Title will be amended if I'm wrong. :)

Camera (except for SWIR) was Sony A7S converted, lens was EL-Nikkor 80mm/5.6. For SWIR, the Wollensack 25mm/1.4 lens was used.

Visible
650-405nm using BG38 2mm and DB850 dual bandpass filter
Attached Image: _DSC2700 vis (S8612 1.75mm + DB850) UVP.jpg

Attached Image: _DSC2721 vis (BG38 2mm + DB850) UVP.jpg

UV
This is under Convoy S2+ 365nm. Filters were S8612 1.75mm and UG11 2mm.
Saturation drastically boosted.
Attached Image: _DSC2698 UV (S8612 1.75mm + UG11 2mm) UVP.jpg

This is in sunshine.
Attached Image: _DSC2706 UV (S8612 1.75mm + UG11 2mm) UVP.jpg

IRG
With Tiffen #12 and DB850 dual bandpass filters.
Attached Image: _DSC2701 IRG (Tiffen12 + DB850) UVP.jpg

UVIVF
BG38 2mm and DB850 dual bandpass filters on the camera, and a filtered Convoy S2+. White balance chosen to roughly match the flower color as it looked to me.
Attached Image: _DSC2717,19 UVIVF (BG38 2mm + DB850) focal stack UVP.jpg

UVIIF
Hoya R72 on the camera, filtered Convoy S2+
Attached Image: _DSC2723 UVIIF (Hoya R72) UVP.jpg

SWIR 1500-1600
TriWave camera, 1500-1600nm Thorlabs bandpass filter
Attached Image: yellow loosestrife SWIR sharpened denoised.jpg

Edited by Andy Perrin, 29 July 2019 - 23:20.


#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 19:11

The IRG is so striking! An excellent series, thanks for posting.

Yes, this is a Yellow Loostrife, genus Lysimachia. Of the 14 Lysimachia species in New England, color and structural characteristics narrow it down to 4 possibilities of which I think Lysimachia punctata is a likely possibility.


Here is a link to Birna's Norwegian version: Lysimachia punctata [Dotted Loosestrife]
Interesting side note: L. punctata is blacklisted in Norway as an invasive pest. Here in New England it is not. At least so far.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 Andy Perrin

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 20:14

It’s the first time I’ve seen it here, being grown as a bush adjoining the street. I don’t think it’s invasive in our climate? Based on N=1 samples.

#4 nfoto

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 20:32

You wouldn't by chance have a photo of the entire plant? There is this feeling we *might* be dealing with a different species. The genus is correct, however.

#5 Cadmium

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 20:50

I like the IRG and the UVIIRF.

#6 Andy Perrin

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 20:56

I don't have a photo of the whole plant but it's not far away. I can get one.

#7 nfoto

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 21:02

Please do. The correct ID will be much easier and more secure.

#8 Andy Perrin

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 21:54

Ok, try these.

Same plant, standing at different distances. Moving from farther to closer.

Attached Image: IMG_6809 whole plant 1.jpg

Attached Image: IMG_6810 whole plant 2.jpg

Attached Image: IMG_6811 whole plant 3.jpg

#9 nfoto

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 23:12

Must be L. punctata, but nowhere near the vigour of growth and flowering we are accustomed to over here.

#10 Andy Perrin

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 23:19

Probably why it's not considered "invasive" down here. Maybe we are at the edge of its favored climate?

#11 Andrea B.

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 04:31

The petal edges are ciliate with little stalked glands. There are *no* staminodes. Filaments are connate near the base. The corolla is 5-merous. Petals not dotted or streaked with black or red. Stems are slightly fuzzy. Calyx lobes have no red/brown margins. Can't be anything else in New England but L. punctata. :lol:

Here you see this flower mostly in gardens. There are, of course, some escapes.
Andrea G. Blum
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