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Finspång Castle, AI-S Nikkor 24 mm f/2.8

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#1 enricosavazzi

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 17:35

Finspång Castle, about one hour drive from where I live. Sony A7 II, AI-S Nikkor 24 mm f/2.8 at f/4, rear-mounted Baader U 1.25". VIS pictures taken with a different camera and lens, so the angle of view is not exactly the same (the Olympus 12-40 f/2.8 Pro for Micro 4/3 does not appear to be really a 12 mm, but rather a 13 mm).

Attached Image: SUV04719s.JPG
Attached Image: P7110006s.JPG
Note that there is a repaired part of the building face on the left wing, well matched with the rest of the building in VIS, but very obvious in UV.

Attached Image: SUV04713s.JPG
A detail in UV.

Attached Image: SUV04721s.JPG
Attached Image: P7110009s.JPG
The orangery. Also here some details don't match between VIS and UV, for example the second column from the right. However, some damage to the columns on the left is detectable in VIS but not in UV, i.e. just the opposite than on the second column from the right.
-- Enrico Savazzi

#2 Timber

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 19:47

Very good photos Enrico. I am so happy about this accidental UV-capable lens find. 24mm is just perfect for buildings and your photos showing that just like flowers, buildings can hold secrets in UV.

#3 Andy Perrin

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 20:04

Quite nice results, and I like the photos themselves (as photos) too. The UV ones look kind of dark on my monitor, though.

#4 Andrea B.

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 01:14

We are UV sleuths! Inspect any used car or house before finalizing purchase.
I wonder what caused the need for repairs to the Castle?

(The UV photos are a bit dark on my monitor also.)
Andrea G. Blum
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#5 enricosavazzi

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 05:20

View PostAndrea B., on 12 July 2019 - 01:14, said:

We are UV sleuths! Inspect any used car or house before finalizing purchase.
I wonder what caused the need for repairs to the Castle?

(The UV photos are a bit dark on my monitor also.)
I forgot to add that the pictures are JPGs straight out of camera, no post-processing except cropping and reducing the size. Plenty of gradation is recorded and can be extracted in post-processing, for example:

Attached Image: SUV04713es.jpg
(although the trees look funny when extracting maximum detail from the building and sky)

Edited by enricosavazzi, 12 July 2019 - 05:27.

-- Enrico Savazzi

#6 Timber

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 07:17

they looked okay on my PC (I have a 10 bit monitor, so much more detail in shadows), but look dark on my laptop. But dark or not... they are amazing <3

#7 Adrian

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 05:02

Enrico, Can I ask how you rear mount a Baader U filter on a Nikon 24mm lens please?
Thanks
Adrian Davies
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#8 enricosavazzi

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 10:15

View PostAdrian, on 13 July 2019 - 05:02, said:

Enrico, Can I ask how you rear mount a Baader U filter on a Nikon 24mm lens please?
Thanks
This is of course possible only when using mirrorless cameras.

So far I have used two different ways. While I was investigating M42 wideangles, i modified a few lens adapters (M42 to Sony E in this case) to mount 30.5 mm filters (via a 37 to 30.5 mm step-down ring) in the adapter, just at the rear of the lens. Mounting and unmounting the filter in these adapters is difficult. These no-brand adapters are cheap, so I was using one adapter for each frequently used filter. Instead of swapping filters, I was swapping adapters.

Attached Image: P6150077s.JPG

The picture (from my web site but right now I don't remember which page) shows a disassembled modified adapter, and an assembled one. By adding empty filter rings it is possible to increase the depth of the filter within the adapter.

With the AI-S Nikkor 24 mm, I had to deal with a different lens mount. Metabones Nikon F to Sony E adapters are quite expensive, so I decided to modify a 37 to 30.5 mm step-down ring and attach it at the rear of the lens with silicone (so that the modification is semi-permanent, but if need arises reversible. To swap filters, I need to remove the lens.

Attached Image: P7130110s.JPG

I had to file away part of the perimeter of the adapter to make it fit around a protuberance at the rear of the lens. The picture also shows an unmodified step-down ring.

With other lenses, the step-down ring or adapter may need to be different. 37 mm step-down rings are too large to pass through the shelf at the rear of some M42 adapters, for example.

The DEO-Tech adapters are a third way, although a bit expensive. The filter mounts near the rear of the adapters, so not suitable for small (1.25") filters. I have been tempted, but they only carry Nikon and Canon adapters while I often use M42 lenses (which might fit the Canon adapter via one more intermediate adapter, so things were getting complicated).
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-- Enrico Savazzi

#9 Timber

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 14:36

Use a Canon EF - Sony FE adapter as it has a wide mount then use a Nikon-Canon adapter.

#10 Mark Jones

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 20:18

I like those rear filters. seems mirrorless is quite good for allowing unique modificaitons.
Peace, Mark Jones, Charlotte, NC, UV amateur photographer.