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Surgical Scars in Reflected UV & UVIF

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#1 LC2

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 16:12

My coworker had surgery a few months ago, and I wanted to see how her scars would look in the UV world...

The first 2 shots are for reference (visible light, regular DSLR).

The 3rd & 4th shots are with a converted D7100, Coastal Optics UV-VIS-IR 60mm Macro, Baader U filter, and 365nm LED torch.

The 5th & 6th shots are with the regular DSLR again, but this time I turned off all the lights and illuminated my co worker's leg with the 365nm LED torch... very interestingly, you can really see the bruising in those shots! I didn't expect that...

The reflected UV images are interesting too, as you can see the actual stitching in her scar... but I find the specular highlights pretty distracting... I tried all different angles with the torch, and those were the best shots I could manage. I was thinking of shining the torch through a diffuser of some sort to see if that might help?

Attached Images

  • Attached Image: Front Leg Visible.jpg
  • Attached Image: Scar Visible.jpg
  • Attached Image: Front Leg Reflected UV.jpg
  • Attached Image: Scar Reflected UV.jpg
  • Attached Image: Front Leg UV Fluorescence.jpg
  • Attached Image: Scar UV Fluorescence.jpg


#2 Andy Perrin

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 16:51

Cool! Jonathan did some work on using polarizers to get rid of the specular reflections in UV. He wouldn’t say at that time which polarizers he used but maybe he would tell you privately? You should look at his post here:
http://www.ultraviol...dpost__p__18469

Edited by Andy Perrin, 11 December 2018 - 16:55.


#3 LC2

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 17:35

Oh that looks awesome! I had a quick peak at that thread, and it looks like a polarizer would totally do the trick! How clever... thank you! I will definitely look into that.

#4 nfoto

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 17:40

UV certainly be NOT on the list of tools in a beauty shop :D Up close, our skin becomes that of octogenarians -- not there yet.

Fluorescence from particles of dirt and lint is typical for UV work.

#5 JMC

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 19:46

Very cool. I've done some similar work recently with uv reflectance, and fluorescence on a much fainter scar, with the aim of boosting contrast compared to normal photography. I'll have to rewrite the report a bit before sharing, but should be able to do that before too long.

#6 Cadmium

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 20:20

I find the little white speckles to be the interesting part in these UV shots.

#7 LC2

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 14:45

View Postnfoto, on 11 December 2018 - 17:40, said:

UV certainly be NOT on the list of tools in a beauty shop Up close, our skin becomes that of octogenarians -- not there yet.

Fluorescence from particles of dirt and lint is typical for UV work.
I had to look up octogenarian... so true!! Very unforgiving... my coworker was horrified :P

View PostJMC, on 11 December 2018 - 19:46, said:

Very cool. I've done some similar work recently with uv reflectance, and fluorescence on a much fainter scar, with the aim of boosting contrast compared to normal photography. I'll have to rewrite the report a bit before sharing, but should be able to do that before too long.
That would be great to see the results on a fainter scar... It's tough to find good subjects!
Apparently the optimal time for the visualization of bruising with reflective UV is between 3 weeks and 5 months, so says T.J. David & M.N. Sobel in a 1994 issue of the Journal of Forensic Science anyway... Their article is referred to quite a bit in the forensic community.
I am also very interested in your work with polarizers to remove the specular highlights... I'm planning to read your paper from the International Journal of Cosmetic Science as soon as I get a moment.

View PostCadmium, on 11 December 2018 - 20:20, said:

I find the little white speckles to be the interesting part in these UV shots.
It is very interesting! Kinda like a piece of raw chicken...

Edited by LC2, 12 December 2018 - 14:46.


#8 Andy Perrin

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 23:01

Quote

Apparently the optimal time for the visualization of bruising with reflective UV is between 3 weeks and 5 months, so says T.J. David & M.N. Sobel in a 1994 issue of the Journal of Forensic Science anyway... Their article is referred to quite a bit in the forensic community.
Interesting. That is quite a wide time interval. At least it gives you plenty of time for documentation of the injury.

#9 LC2

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 14:38

View PostAndy Perrin, on 12 December 2018 - 23:01, said:

Interesting. That is quite a wide time interval. At least it gives you plenty of time for documentation of the injury.
So true! An interesting project would be to track the healing process of an injury... hmmm, now I just need a good subject... :P

#10 Andrea B.

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 17:41

Thank you for this very interesting set, Lieah.
It's good to have this nice reference example in our forensics section.

You could try light painting with the torch to reduce specular highlights? Takes some practice. "-)
And, yes, a diffuser is useful.
I have a very thin "frosted" plastic diffuser for one of my UV torches. But I don't know where it is from (came with the torch). So search around optics sites and you can probably find diffusing materials which pass UV.
Andrea G. Blum
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#11 LC2

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 15:10

View PostAndrea B., on 02 January 2019 - 17:41, said:

Thank you for this very interesting set, Lieah.
It's good to have this nice reference example in our forensics section.

You could try light painting with the torch to reduce specular highlights? Takes some practice. "-)
And, yes, a diffuser is useful.
I have a very thin "frosted" plastic diffuser for one of my UV torches. But I don't know where it is from (came with the torch). So search around optics sites and you can probably find diffusing materials which pass UV.
Thanks so much! I will definitely look for a diffuser and see how that goes... perhaps the manufacturer of torch I have sells diffusers....
And also, practice my painting with light technique :)
Thanks!!