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1958 Soviet Mir-1 2.8/37 with reversed front glass element in infrared+visible

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#1 SteveCampbell

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 02:50

1958 Soviet Mir-1 2.8/37 with reversed front glass element in infrared+visible on a full-spectrum 5D mark II

I'm pretty sure the MIR-1 is 1958 since it's a 00-prefixed serial number in cyrillic, but perhaps someone more knowledgeable can correct

Attached Image: IMG_8979-2.jpg
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#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 14:35

This is way cool.....

I don't know whether we have anyone who knows about MIRs or not ?? I think I've seen a website for Russian/Soviet lenses, but don't have a link. I wonder why the 37 mm focal length?
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#3 SteveCampbell

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 21:54

View PostAndrea B., on 22 July 2018 - 14:35, said:

This is way cool.....

I don't know whether we have anyone who knows about MIRs or not ?? I think I've seen a website for Russian/Soviet lenses, but don't have a link. I wonder why the 37 mm focal length?

Off the top of my head I believe it was a copy of the 2.8/35mm Zeiss flektagon, using patents that were confiscated from the Germans as war reparations. It's possible that the Russians weren't able to perfectly reengineer the 35mm focal length.
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#4 Andy Perrin

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 22:45

That is a nifty special effect. What is up with the "reversed front element"?

#5 SteveCampbell

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 23:50

View PostAndy Perrin, on 22 July 2018 - 22:45, said:

That is a nifty special effect. What is up with the "reversed front element"?

The front element on the Mir-1 is meniscus-shaped. By inverting it you end up with a concave front surface that causes the peripheral dispersion effect (is there a more precise optical term?) that you see in the photo
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#6 Andy Perrin

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 01:28

Is it a decent lens when the front element is the right way round?

#7 SteveCampbell

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 03:30

View PostAndy Perrin, on 23 July 2018 - 01:28, said:

Is it a decent lens when the front element is the right way round?

Yea, it's quite a sharp lens with a very long throw, and beautiful aesthetics (I have an early metal version). You get a decent subtle swirl bokeh with appropriate focus distance, but not as pronounced as Helios 44/40 or the biotars. Great handling.
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#8 SteveCampbell

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 10:56

View PostAndy Perrin, on 23 July 2018 - 01:28, said:

Is it a decent lens when the front element is the right way round?

A quick test showed that it's not very useful in UV however...
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#9 Dmitry

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 12:50

Recent test of this lens made in 1985. There are better lenses exist for sure. But it may have limited use in UV.

#10 SteveCampbell

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 22:12

View PostDmitry, on 23 July 2018 - 12:50, said:

Recent test of this lens made in 1985. There are better lenses exist for sure. But it may have limited use in UV.

Mine is the earlier M39-mount MIR-1, but I'd imagine it didn't change much optically. Thanks Dmitry!
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