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Verticordia lepidophylla var. lepidophylla

Fluorescence
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#1 DaveO

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:13

Oldfield, D. 2018. Verticordia lepidophylla F.Muell. var. lepidophylla (Myrtaceae) Flowers photographed in visible and ultraviolet light. http://www.ultraviol...r-lepidophylla/

Maldon, Victoria, Australia
17 December 2017
Australian Native Wildflower as Garden Specimen


Comment
Verticordia lepidophylla var. lepidophylla is named from the Greek lepidos (a scale) and phyllon (a leaf), in reference to the small leaves. The type collection was gathered near the Murchison River in Western Australia during the 1880s by Augustus Oldfield.

Visible Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Metz 15 MS-1 flash, 1/200 s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV/IR Cut Filter.
Attached Image: Verticordia_lepidophylla_var_lepidophylla_Vis.jpg
Image Reference: DO65075

Ultraviolet Light: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens, Nissin Di866 Mark II flash, 1/200s @ f/16 ISO 200, Baader UV-Pass Filter.
Attached Image: Verticordia_lepidophylla_var_lepidophylla_UV.jpg
Image Reference: DO65077

Ultraviolet Induced Visible Fluorescence: Nikon D750 Full Spectrum Modification, Nikon Rayfact PF10545 MF-UV 105 mm f/4.5 lens with Baader UV/IR Cut Filter, Nichia NCSU033A UV-LED with Baader UV-Pass Filter, 10.0 s @ f/16 ISO 1600.
Attached Image: Verticordia_lepidophylla_var_lepidophylla_UVIVFL.jpg
Image Reference: DO65078

Reference:
George (Berndt), E.A. and Pieroni, M. Verticordia, the turner of hearts, University of Western Australia Press, 2002, p. 364

Published 1 February 2018

Edited by DaveO, 01 February 2018 - 02:14.


#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 17:13

Today I'm noticing the feathery sepals under the feather petals.
Andrea G. Blum
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#3 DaveO

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 23:42

Remember this is myrtaceae where we also have eucalyptus and what look like petals there are nothing of the sort. Australian botany tries its best to confuse you folk from the northern hemisphere.

#4 Andrea B.

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 07:06

:D :D :D
We have one or two of those confusion flowers here too -- where what appear to be "petals" are really "sepals" or "tepals" or heaven knows what!

I was just wondering (late night musings) how many wildflowers do the US and Aus have in common? I frequently see in the field manuals that some weedy little wildflower I've just identified was introduced from Europe (stowed away on an Atlantic boat, no doubt). And I also read - a bit less frequently - that a specimen was introduced from Asia (via Pacific shipping, probably). But I don't recall seeing mention of introductions from Australia. Perhaps trade between our two countries was more indirect in the old shipping days - through the UK maybe?
Andrea G. Blum
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#5 DaveO

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 08:55

On the contrary, there was a very direct trade between California and Sydney around the time of both our gold rushes. And surely you must remember our "gift" of Melaleuca species to Florida and Eucalyptus to California. Best to stop remembering at this point :rolleyes:

#6 Andrea B.

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 05:03

Did not know this about the California-Sydney trading! Interesting.
Andrea G. Blum
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#7 DaveO

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 08:38

We had your New England sealers and whalers as well

#8 Andrea B.

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 21:00

oh la! This all shows you what I know about history. Not much! :D
I never liked it in school. But in later years I've come to enjoy reading certain history books.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.