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Hypsopygia olinalis [Yellow-fringed Dolichomia]: Multispectral Set

Multispectral
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#1 Mark

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 14:58

When I found this little moth (Yellow-fringed Dolichomia) in my yard, it was rather indifferent to my investigations - so I took it inside for a photo session. While it was very cooperative for the time I had it, I did have other problems... lens problems.

This multispectral set was shot with my 78mm quartz lens. This is not a corrected lens, and the problem of using such a lens presents itself here, most obvious in the UVIVF image. This lens just will not produce crisp VIS images. I applied a fair amount of sharpening to the VIS image, which helped some; but the UVIVF image was just beyond salvage (I apologize for the blurriness). Since shooting this I've decided to try shooting multispectral sets with two cameras - one (modified) for UV/IR, and another (stock) for VIS/UVIVF. I anticipate some frustration in PP image alignment, etc, but the quality of the results should be worth it.

In the mean time, I'd like to share the results I got, however compromised.

These shots were taken with the subject inside a small aquarium. Note how translucent to almost opaque the silicone seal is in VIS/UVIVF/UV, while its highly transparent in IR (the moth is hanging on the silicone - in the IR image the black frame of the aquarium is visible through the silicone).

Attached Image: 07-05-2017_21-04-06.jpg

Camera
- Nikon D750 [broadband] + 78 mm UV quartz lens + 36 mm extension tube
Lens filters
- UV: Asahi ZRR0340
- UVIVF: EO 425 nm longpass + Hoya Y [K2] + Baader UV/IR [stack]

- VIS: EO 425 nm longpass + Baader UV/IR [stack]
- IR: Hoya R72
Illumination/Irradiation
- VIS: Sigma EF-500 DG Super flash
- UV, UVIVF: UVGL-58 lamp @ 366 nm
- IR: 40 W incandescent clear glass bulb
Exposures
- ISO320 / f8 / 0.6-6.0s, as needed


#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 15:22

Quite amazing that this fellow shows that red fluorescence. A charming discovery.

There are conversion apps which have chromatic abberation tools. Would that help? I don't know what you are using. Photo Ninja has a CA tool, for example.

Most moths are night flyers. So I suppose it's fair to say that we would not expect much light/dark patterning in the UV. But then there's that fluorescence requiring UV. Tis a mystery.
Andrea G. Blum
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#3 Mark

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 00:03

I've been using Capture NX-D; which I like very much. And now that you mention it, I just checked and found it has both lateral and axial color aberration correction options. I can give those tools a try, but I don't think I'll hope for much, since the problem is more of a focus problem (vs chromatic aberration like blue/yellow fringe, etc). I'll give it a try in my next set.

#4 Andy Perrin

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 01:21

Mark, can you please send me the UVIVF at around 2048px width or so? I want to try something.

#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 01:28

Worth a try, let me know how if anything works out.

Would separating the channels and resizing them work maybe?
Andrea G. Blum
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#6 Mark

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 16:53

@Andy: Sorry for the late reply (been very busy lately) - I don't have a higher res version saved from this set (I normally delete any copies of images I don't deem to be 'save worthy').

@Andrea: Separating channels wouldn't work in this regard, because one of the channels (depending on where focus was set) is simply way out of focus. I'll shoot a an image with this lens sometime pointedly to show the focus-shift.