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Australian Native Flowers, UV Reflectance Patterns


15 replies to this topic

#1 colinbm

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 05:57

Hi everyone
Just came across this small entry.....
"UV REFLECTANCE PATTERNS IN THE FLOWERS OF AUSTRALIAN NATIVE PLANTS" 1988.
http://www.aff.org.a...tance_final.pdf
Someone maybe interested to follow it up & get some value out of it ?
Cheers
Col

#2 nfoto

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 09:04

It follows the the trend of telling us some plants have UV reflectance, some not. Today's UV photography has brought far better insights into the actual UV signatures in play.

Our esteemed Australian members could perhaps test some of the examples mentioned in the text.
Bjørn Birna Rørslett, Ph.D.
Just call me Birna

#3 DaveO

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 09:41

This was one of the first references I found for UV and Australian natives. It does have a link to very grainy and blurry B&W photos of some of the patterns. The technique used only showed if there was refection versus no reflection. I recently posted Goodenia blackiana which does show a pattern as the paper reported, however they also reported no UV pattern for Brachyscome multifida which I have also just posted so you can see for yourself the advantages we now have by being able to create false colour UV digital images.

You can also Google Adrian Dyer at Monash University and get his publication list which is very interesting.

Cheers,

Dave

#4 colinbm

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 10:31

Thanks Bjorn & good on you Dave for being on the ball :D
Dr Adrian Dyer has been a prolific researcher & writer, I also notice he is a regular co-author with Professor Lars Chittka, who is mentioned here many times.
Cheers
Col

#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 15:46

I think Bjørn's use of "UV Signature" is the correct terminology to characterize the appearance of a flower in UV now that we can truly see UV signatures with our modified DSLRs. Simply labeling a flower reflective or non-reflective or as having a "pattern" does not describe the very complex reality.

Things were so primitive (my opinion only) when film was used for UV photography !!!

I hope that Dyer and Chittka and other hear of our UVP website and see what we are doing here.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#6 nfoto

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 16:19

Never forget the past lays the foundation for the future.
Bjørn Birna Rørslett, Ph.D.
Just call me Birna

#7 Andrea B.

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 16:45

Indeed. I mean no disparagement to early UV fotography efforts !! It's just that we have gained so much because of the digital evolution. It's quite amazing really. And can only get better methinks.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#8 DaveO

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 00:31

OK, time to bring out my feeble glow from under the bushel

Oldfield, D. (2014) Ultraviolet photos of Australian native plants Growing Australian, March 2014, p. 8, Australian Plants Society Victoria Inc., ISSN 0814-7701

Oldfield, D. (2014) Macro Photographs of Wild Flowers under Ultraviolet RPS Journal May 2014, p. 236, The Royal Photographic Society, ISSN 1468 8670.

Dave

#9 colinbm

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 00:44

Congratulations Dave, I hope this brings you more then 15 minutes of fame :D
As my friends in genealogy say...publish or perish.....
Cheers
Col

#10 JCDowdy

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 21:53

View PostAndrea B., on 25 January 2014 - 15:46, said:

I hope that Dyer and Chittka and other hear of our UVP website and see what we are doing here.

Dr Dyer was kind enough to send me some reprints of some of his papers I requested recently.

I sent him a link to ultravioletphotography.com about a month ago, I shall refresh the invitation. :D

- John

#11 JCDowdy

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 22:56

Congratulations, DaveO!

#12 Andrea B.

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 16:35

Dave, that's awesome - congrats !!
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#13 enricosavazzi

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 18:56

I may spend a couple of weeks in and around Melbourne in December. If I can manage to squeeze my Micro 4/3 UV camera and a couple of small UV lenses in my hand luggage allowance (in addition to a much larger Micro 4/3 kit for normal photography), I plan to do some field UV work.
-- Enrico Savazzi

#14 DaveO

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 04:09

Please drop me a PM when your plans have firmed, one place you should put onto your list is the new Royal Botanical Garden at Cranbourne to the east of Melbourne which will blow your mind about the possibilities of Australian Native Wildflowers.

Dave

#15 enricosavazzi

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 15:39

Thanks for the suggestion Dave. I moved my trip slightly earlier (Nov. 15-29). Botanical gardens (both Cranbourne and the Royal one), zoo and Sea Life aquarium are on my list now. I will probably take also one or two organized day trips along the coast and/or to Healesville Wildlife Sanctuary, and then a few more exotic subjects (including the dinosaur localities) with some people I know at Monash University.

I am still unsure how much UV equipment I will take on the trip. The VIS camera backpack is already around 6 kg without any UV stuff, so probably just the Panasonic G3, UV Rodagon 60 mm on helicoid and three filters (Baader U, B+W 486 and 850 nm low-pass for NIR). The Olympus 20 mm f/3.5 is on my reserve list, since my daughter can probably pack some of my additional equipment in her carry-on. A tripod will travel in my suitcase. I will rely on sunlight for UV illumination.
-- Enrico Savazzi

#16 DaveO

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 00:07

I'm sure you will have no trouble with not enough UV in the sunlight, even today the UV index is predicted to reach 9 so it will be higher by the time you are here.

Have a good trip

dave