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Radio about colorblindness lenses

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#1 Cadmium

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 08:42

Colorblindness glasses:
https://youtu.be/TiqeLChNu7Q

Click ">" Play button/icon upper left to listen to story.

https://www.npr.org/...nting-accidents

Edited by Cadmium, 20 January 2019 - 15:46.


#2 Andy Broomé

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 01:36

Interesting development. Wonder what the difference is, if any, when these lenses are placed over a camera lens.

#3 Cadmium

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 08:45

View PostAndy Broomé, on 25 January 2019 - 01:36, said:

Interesting development. Wonder what the difference is, if any, when these lenses are placed over a camera lens.

I find the whole idea intriguing. Obviously, it would be more than intriguing to colorblind people, a lot of them, I think the video said 1 in 12 men, and 1 in 200 women, 30 million people in the USA alone.
So...
Also they said in the video that the lens/filter suppresses ("cuts out") yellow light.
Well, that is similar to what B+W Redhancer 491, and Schott BG36 do, they cut out yellow light, and make other colors more pronounced.
I did a Schott BG36 and B+W Redhancer 491 overlay graph below, see how they both suppress yellow?
I think some astronomy night sky light pollution filters do that also.
Food for thought.

Attached Image: Schott_BG36_vs_BW_Redhancer.jpg

Edited by Cadmium, 25 January 2019 - 08:45.


#4 Andy Perrin

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 14:07

I have both color blindness and also a neodymium astronomy filter (Hoya Red Intensifier). I don’t see any improvement through the filter. I have not tried the dedicated glasses yet, however.

Edited by Andy Perrin, 25 January 2019 - 15:17.


#5 OlDoinyo

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 03:27

I don't understand how this could work. The most common kind of color blindness is dichromacy, either red-minus or green-minus usually, where the respective channel is missing from the visual system. No filter could possibly compensate for a missing channel as far as I can see. (I also knew someone who was a rod-only monochromat, with vestigial to no cone cells and macular blindness, but this form is less common, I hear.)

#6 Cadmium

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 05:11

He he... :)
https://youtu.be/Bpa6D-Mo5-I

Andi, if you ever get up to Andover, there is a store where you could try them out, closest they show on their map.

Edited by Cadmium, 26 January 2019 - 05:33.


#7 Cadmium

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 05:47

"...adjust the quantal catch of the photo pigments to reestablish some normalcy to the chromatic channels."

https://www.youtube....=youtu.be&t=102

#8 Mark

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 16:01

I wonder if the opposite of these glasses exist? That is, glasses which will reduce to some greater or lesser extent the perception of color in normal visioned people. In other words, evenly shifting normal vision towards grayscale (without any given single-color tinting). It could be a good educational tool for helping non-impaired people to understand what it's like to be color-compromised.

#9 Andy Perrin

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 17:10

Mark, I know in low light we rely mainly on rods, so it’s almost what you are describing?

#10 Andy Perrin

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 17:30

View PostOlDoinyo, on 26 January 2019 - 03:27, said:

I don't understand how this could work. The most common kind of color blindness is dichromacy, either red-minus or green-minus usually, where the respective channel is missing from the visual system. No filter could possibly compensate for a missing channel as far as I can see. (I also knew someone who was a rod-only monochromat, with vestigial to no cone cells and macular blindness, but this form is less common, I hear.)
No, that's not how color blindness works. We aren't actually missing a channel, the response to (say) red and green happen to partially overlap, so they can't be easily distinguished. The glasses chop out the colors between red and green (yellow?) so they can be distinguished again, at least if the overlap is partial.

#11 Mark

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 22:28

@Andy: Yes, that could approximate what I'm thinking of. But I'd like to imagine a scenario wherein I would not be walking around in the (almost) dark :). Also, it would be difficult to really get a good sense of the effect (no pun intended), because our light-sensitive-yet-color-blind rods are dominant everywhere in the retina except for the fovea - so I wouldn't very well be able to 'look at' the effect; at least not in my focal view. To be certain, I can recall such colorless perception in low light circumstances - and at the same time I recall how it is almost counter-intuitively easier to see something in very low light when not looking directly at it (a consequence of our cone's limited light sensitivity compared to rods). To be clear, I don't have any desire at all for whatever aesthetic could be said of removing color from our vision (under any lighting condition). I just think it would be an interesting experience, in one way or another.