• Ultraviolet Photography
  •  

Clip-in filters - anyone have experience with these?

5 replies to this topic

#1 Andy Perrin

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 1,638 posts
  • Location: United States

Posted 11 September 2018 - 17:40

I'm really tempted by this STC UV/IR cut filter that goes inside the camera body.
https://www.cyclopso...sony-alpha-7-9/

Has anyone used these kind of filters before? How about this brand? Are they easy to get in and out?

#2 A.S.

    Member

  • Members
  • 30 posts
  • Location: Germany

Posted 12 September 2018 - 05:27

I know two Astronomik Clip-in filters for several weeks.
https://www.astronom...lpha-7r-7s.html

One is a UV/IR Cut (L-2) and one a special IR (642 BP) filter. If you have an infinity focus problem with modified camera than it is most probably solved with a Clip-in filter. It is possible that in some cases there is a shadowing in edges visible with a Clip-in filter.
In the case of the special IR filter (642 BP) I have a color shift from center to edges and therefore this filter is unsuitable for wide angle lenses. I think this is not the case for my UV/IR Cut filter.

In my opinion Clip-in filters are nice. However on the way if you want to take UV/Visible/IR images with same lens it is maybe better to change a filter in front of the lens instead of removing always the lens.

#3 UlfW

    Ulf W

  • Members(+)
  • 366 posts
  • Location: Sweden, Malmö

Posted 12 September 2018 - 06:13

I have four different Astronomik filters for my Canon 60D (APS-C).
They are not used very often except for lenses that cannot take my threaded normal filters.

The advantage with them is that you can use them with all lenses, even fish-eye types and change lens easily without fiddling with the filter.
The disadvantage is that you expose the sensor for a potential contamination and risk getting sensor dust each time you are changing filters.
It is not that easy to change these filters with the camera locked in position on a tripod for a motive.
The best position handling-wise when changing these filters is with the sensor facing upwards. Dirt often fall downwards if it is not small.

I often like to get a VIS reference image too and change filters often. I hate sensor dust!!!

Edited by UlfW, 12 September 2018 - 06:19.

Ulf Wilhelmson
Curious and trying to see the invisible.

#4 Andy Perrin

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 1,638 posts
  • Location: United States

Posted 12 September 2018 - 06:17

Hah, I hate sensor dust also. But I am having trouble with my screw-on UV/IR cut making dancing lens flare-type things at night.

#5 Cadmium

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 1,791 posts

Posted 12 September 2018 - 06:26

Pertaining to the first link, I only see one clip filter for a Nikon. It would be interesting to get the clip with no filter and make the filter to fit the clips, they only seem to offer one filter for the Nikon.
I didin't see any info about the clip filter interfering with the mirror in the Nikon, so I don't know if the clip goes behind the mirror or not.

#6 UlfW

    Ulf W

  • Members(+)
  • 366 posts
  • Location: Sweden, Malmö

Posted 12 September 2018 - 06:34

View PostCadmium, on 12 September 2018 - 06:26, said:

Pertaining to the first link, I only see one clip filter for a Nikon. It would be interesting to get the clip with no filter and make the filter to fit the clips, they only seem to offer one filter for the Nikon.
I didin't see any info about the clip filter interfering with the mirror in the Nikon, so I don't know if the clip goes behind the mirror or not.
Normally these filters are quite thin and possibly with the same optical path length to not interfere with the telescope optics.
At least with my cameras there is not enough space for thicker filters/stacks.
Ulf Wilhelmson
Curious and trying to see the invisible.