• Ultraviolet Photography
  •  

Fields of mystery flowers

5 replies to this topic

#1 Jim Lloyd

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 300 posts

Posted 03 August 2018 - 09:54

This has nothing to do with UV photography, but I know there are a lot of expert botanists here, so I hope you don't mind me asking.

Cycling in the Scottish borders (recommended!) yesterday came across a few fields completely full of this flower. Any idea what it is and why it would be grown in fields?

Attached Image: IMG_1332.JPG

Attached Image: IMG_1330.JPG

#2 Andrea B.

    Desert Dancer

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 6,729 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 03 August 2018 - 13:07

Jim, this flower appears to be a kind of Phacelia. But I don't know enough about European/Scottish flowers to go further than that. We will have to wait for Birna to drop by. (I am not currently at home where my British flower book is.)

We never mind anybody asking anything !!

How lovely to bicycle around Scotland and find such a vast field of flowers.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 nfoto

    Fierce Bear of the North

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 2,095 posts
  • Location: Sørumsand, Norway

Posted 03 August 2018 - 21:08

Phacelia tanacetifolia. Cultivated to yield honey (eventually). Norwegian name is Honeywort.
Bjørn Birna Rørslett, Ph.D.
Just call me Birna

#4 Andy Broomé

    Invisible Light Enthusiast

  • Members
  • 111 posts
  • Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Posted 03 August 2018 - 21:35

View PostJim Lloyd, on 03 August 2018 - 09:54, said:

Cycling in the Scottish borders (recommended!) yesterday came across a few fields completely full of this flower. Any idea what it is and why it would be grown in fields?
I hope you can go back and take some UV shots - see what the signature is like.

#5 nfoto

    Fierce Bear of the North

  • Owner-Administrator
  • 2,095 posts
  • Location: Sørumsand, Norway

Posted 03 August 2018 - 22:01

Most Phacelia spp. shot during the 2012 US Desert Flower Tour (with Andrea) had quite UV-reflective corollas. I would expect P. tanacetifolia to be similar.
Bjørn Birna Rørslett, Ph.D.
Just call me Birna

#6 Jim Lloyd

    Member

  • Members(+)
  • 300 posts

Posted 05 August 2018 - 21:52

Thanks Andrea and Birna.
Wikipedia also mentions some other uses such as "green manure" - it looks very striking to seen a whole field of this from a distance. I don't think I have ever seen this before grown in this way, unfortunately I don't think ill get chance to take any more pictures (UV or other) as its a long drive (well in UK terms) from where we live.