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IR Image of Marsh Marigold

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#1 UlfW

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 16:48

The picture below is an attempt to create a nice looking result from an IR image.
I tried to give the picture a style similar to some Chinese or Japanese art I have seen.

Attached Image: _MG_4024s.jpg

The plant is a Marsh Marigold, Caltha palustris.

Camera: Canon EOS 60D, ISO100, 1/500s.
Lens EL-NIKKOR 80/5.6 at f/8
Filter: Zomei IR 680nm

Processing: much contrast and saturation is applied, but nothing else, if I remember correctly after almost a year.
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 17:47

Yes, this is a beautiful treatment. I enjoy IR photographs so much because they can be taken in many different artistic directions like you have done here.

I like the flower color and have been trying to think what its color name might be - peach, perhaps?
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#3 UlfW

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 18:15

The VIS and UV versions are not as pleasing, (S8612 + BG38 and Baader U):

Attached Image: _MG_4002.jpg Attached Image: _MG_4021.jpg

By the way, is it of interest that I add the Swedish name of the plants?
The one above is called Kabeleka

Edited by UlfW, 30 April 2018 - 04:57.

Ulf Wilhelmson
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#4 Cadmium

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 19:06

Ulf, Nice shots.
You stack BG38 + S8612 for visual? Reason being? Just curious.
What is that bamboo-ish looking 'reed' stuff? We have that here, I tried to transplant some of it once, it died.
Attached Image: BG38_2mm_x_S8612_2mm.jpg

Edited by Cadmium, 29 April 2018 - 19:07.


#5 Andy Perrin

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 03:01

View PostUlfW, on 29 April 2018 - 18:15, said:

The VIS and UV versions are not as pleasing, (S8612 + BG38 and Baader U):
Okay, maybe I've just been hanging around this site too long, but I honestly like the UV one most of the three.

#6 UlfW

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 04:29

View PostCadmium, on 29 April 2018 - 19:06, said:

Ulf, Nice shots.
You stack BG38 + S8612 for visual? Reason being? Just curious.
What is that bamboo-ish looking 'reed' stuff? We have that here, I tried to transplant some of it once, it died.
Attachment BG38_2mm_x_S8612_2mm.jpg

Steve - This is what happens when I write without the brain connected. :)
It must have been all the writing about different filter stacks before created a bad habit of including the S8612 everywhere in the text.

For the VIS-image above there was no S8612, only a BG38. (Corrected above now).
I do not like the S8612 for visual as it cut too much into the red.

I have no idea what the bamboo-ish plants are, sorry.
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#7 UlfW

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 09:28

View PostAndy Perrin, on 30 April 2018 - 03:01, said:

Okay, maybe I've just been hanging around this site too long, but I honestly like the UV one most of the three.
Andy, then you might like this even better.
I think it is an improvement of the UV-version, even if the image is quite busy, compared to the NIR version.

Attached Image: _MG_4019-002.jpg

I have been practicing a bit with processing difficult RAW-images.
It is interesting to see how the size of the UV-signature differ between individual flowers.
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#8 nfoto

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 12:20

The "bamboo" plant is a horsetail Equisetum either E. fluviatile or E. palustre (first being most likely).

The first image is not what I would call IR as there is a lot of red coming through the filter. Still nice, but not the typical "IR" look (which is, for this flower as for so many other, almost a pure white). The UV-dark basal patches on the tepals are not as black as they are on my photos. A variation in patch size between plants (and locations) is noted by me as well.

Interestingly, the blue tinge on stems and foliage show up on many of my Caltha shots too.
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#9 nfoto

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 20:26

Here is a sequence of Marsh Marigold Caltha palustris in VIS, UV, IR. All on the Panasonic GH2 and Coastal 60mm f/4 APO and appropriate filters (Baader UV/IR Cut, Baader U gen.2, R-830).

Attached Image: I1205290232.jpg

Attached Image: I1205290224.jpg

Attached Image: I1205290235.jpg
Bjørn Birna Rørslett, Ph.D.
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#10 Andy Perrin

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 20:50

Those are fantastic, nfoto.

#11 UlfW

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 04:16

Very nice, Birna.

I like the close up style with all the details.
What aperture setting was used.

The colours are very vivid. Are they boosted?
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#12 nfoto

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 10:21

The Panasonic is not very communicative with EXIF when non-native lenses are mounted; here the Coastal Optics 60mm f/4 APO. My field notes say ISO 160 (base value), f/11 and 1/25-1/125 sec, which indicates I have used the SB-140 flash as well. Normal processing in Photo Ninja apparently.

Panasonic (GH-2 here) allows for quite accurate "UV white" balance in camera against a PFTE target. Very useful for UV video, which is the main purpose of having these cameras at present. My usual UV cameras now are Nikon D3200 (with internal Baader U) and a full-spectrum D600. I might swap the latter for a Z6 later this year, though.
Bjørn Birna Rørslett, Ph.D.
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