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Waterworks Museum LWIR pano

LWIR Infrared
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#1 Andy Perrin

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 05:17

The Waterworks Museum, constructed in 1886, is a new museum that opened near me next to Boston College. It's a fantastic building.

FLIR E60, 59 original images
Software: Hugin for stitching, MATLAB for putting all the histograms on the same scale, SmartDeblur for deblurring, exiftool for extracting RAW.

Attached Image: waterworks-museum-thermal_res-UVP.jpg

Vis, iPhone 6S Plus (just for comparison's sake)
Attached Image: waterworks-museum-vis-UVP.jpg

#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 01:55

You have the best old buildings to photograph up there in MA.

Stitched from 59 images! Wow.
Do you use some kind of pano platform on a tripod?

And my usual question.....why are the lightpoles bright in the FLIR foto?
Love the black piles of snow. :D
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 Andy Perrin

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 02:38

Quote

Do you use some kind of pano platform on a tripod?
No, just shoot them hand-held and let the stitcher do its job. I crop it at the end and use content-aware fill in PS to fill in the bits of road and sky that are missing.

Quote

And my usual question.....why are the lightpoles bright in the FLIR foto?
They aren't really bright, they are close to the ambient air temp. The sky is colder, though, even with clouds. A clear sky is between -50F and -80F depending on humidity. A cloudy sky is much warmer, in the 30s, but the air was in the low 40s. There are a couple of things that might make them warmer than ambient:
1) any electrical energy being used inside them (probably not a factor in the daytime)
2) warming by what sunshine there is. It was actually misting out as I was taking the photos, so there was not much sun.

Edited by Andy Perrin, 12 February 2018 - 02:38.


#4 Andrea B.

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 17:16

It looks as though you could walk up to one and feel a bit of heat.

On the left there is a bright shrub. I'd almost bet that it is a forsythia which might be beginning to wake up for the spring bloom. :D The evergreens also look warm-ish.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#5 Andy Perrin

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 17:35

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The evergreens also look warm-ish.
Merely warmer than the background...the sides of the building were soaking wet and so they were cooled by the evaporation I think. I mean, like we discussed, plants do use energy so that's contributing, but it's mostly the contrast with the wet building.

Edited by Andy Perrin, 12 February 2018 - 17:36.