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Yellow water-lily in visible, UV and IR

9 replies to this topic

#1 Lasse Y

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 20:32

One thing I like in UV and IR photography is how different the images can be in UV and IR. For me the yellow water-lily is not the interesting part of these images, actually the plant in the images could be any plant. What makes these images interesting is how they illustrate the difference of the light geometry in UV and IR alongside the huge difference of reflectance of vegetation in UV and IR wavelengths. In UV we see the water surface and in IR the plant seems to float in the air.

Sony NEX-6, UV-Nikkor, filters: Baader UV/IR Cut, Baader U-2, Hoya R72,
in IR and UV the red channel is used for the black and white image.

Visible

Attached Image: waterlily.jpg


UV

Attached Image: waterlilyUV.jpg

IR

Attached Image: waterlilyIR.jpg

Edited by Lasse Y, 09 February 2018 - 20:55.


#2 Andy Perrin

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 22:16

Well that is a new rendition of UV for me! It looks almost like you did an emboss filter in Photoshop (not saying you did, just that's the general visual effect).

#3 nfoto

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 22:37

I'd say the UV rendition is just what would be expected. To compare, here is a White Water lily (Nymphaea alba) in b/w UV. Ignore the flower for the time being and look at the overall UV image.

Attached Image: I1106043785.jpg
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#4 Andy Perrin

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 00:14

Yeah, it is the same. I think, then, that it is the lily, not the method of display, that is news to me.

Edited by Andy Perrin, 10 February 2018 - 00:17.


#5 Andrea B.

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 03:17

It is surprising to me also!
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#6 UlfW

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 12:08

Still it is quite logical with the UV-source, the sky and the reflective surface.
UV from a clear sky come from all directions, due to the Rayleigh-scattering.

The scattering is well described in the paper Lasse shared earlier in his first post.
http://www.ultraviol...gs-fom-finland/
Ulf Wilhelmson
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#7 Andy Perrin

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 15:31

The light water was not surprising to me, but my experience with plants has been that the leaves are usually dark and glossy, more like the flower in nfoto’s picture.

#8 nfoto

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 19:30

Foliage of aquatic plants behave differently in UV compared to most terrestrial species.

Aquatic floating leaves might have epidermal structures (trichomes) to reduce wetting. Maybe that could explain their higher UV reflectance?
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#9 Hornblende

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 20:27

Someshould should take a picture of lotus leaves then.

#10 Alaun

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 17:59

an old shot (GH3-UV-IR, Baader U, UV-Nikkor)

Attached Images

  • Attached Image: _1040520.jpg

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