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[COLOR] Color Name Reference

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#1 Andrea B.

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 20:00

You might enjoy these.
And you might not agree with all the color names!

Color Name & Hue: http://www.color-bli...color-name-hue/

Name That Color: http://chir.ag/proje...t-color/#6195ED

For example: Green (0,255,0) is named "Lime" in that first app and a darker hue is designated as "Green". Makes sense to me because I've always thought that (0,255,0) looked rather Lime-like myself.

But what I've always thought of as "Cerise" (255, 0, 128) is named "Deep Pink" in the first app.

Oh well.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#2 enricosavazzi

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 14:16

Past the most common colors, I think there is some measure of subjectivity (and even fantasy) in color naming.

For one more example, see e.g. https://louisem.com/...rus-infographic

As a side information, before doing any serious color work, I think one should test himself/herself for color blindness. Some types of color blindness are surprisingly common, and some are quite subtle and can escape detection unless rigorously tested. The Ishihara plates are the most frequently used diagnostic tool, see e.g. http://www.color-bli...plates-edition/ . One word of caution is that I don't know if/how the test results can be skewed by using a monitor with poor color rendering or wrongly chosen color settings. It could be that a person with some type of color blindless (or even some type of "improved" vision like the rare, but scientifically verified, cases of human tetrachromats) has, as a result, set up his/her monitor and computer color settings in a way that may affect the result of these tests.
-- Enrico Savazzi

#3 Hornblende

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 15:51

Maybe Andrea is Tetrachromate? :D

Here is a link to the Farnsworth-Munsell test, it can reveal very slight hue perception deficiencies.

Edited by Hornblende, 05 February 2018 - 15:51.


#4 Andrea B.

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Posted 06 February 2018 - 20:16

Maybe Andrea is Tetrachromate?

Nope, I don't think so!! :lol: I've read that daughters of colour-blind fathers (which I am) might have this possibility. But I truly do not think I perceive colours any differently than anyone else*. I've had days where I get some of those patches in the Farnsworth-Munsell test wrongly placed. Other days I get them perfect. That test probably depends a lot on having freshly rested eyes and a good colour monitor, don't you think?

I think anyone who has done a lot of digital colour photography does become somewhat more attuned to colour nuances. But that is because we are "paying attention" to colour on a more involved level than most folks do. A lot of colour recognition is learned behaviour which uses naming as a pointer. Some cultures, for example, name "green" and "blue" with the same name (added: even though they certainly can distinguish between green & blue). Other examples like this abound. But naming a colour only takes you down to a certain separation between colours. There would be no way to name those Farnsworth-Munsell patches from end-to-end. Might drive a person crazy to try!!


*Boring footnote here: I don't perceive colours any differently than anyone else ...... aside from the anomaly of having one eye with a cataract repair and the other not. Separately each eye percieves violet and blue differently. The "new" eye from which the cataract was removed sees violet and blue better than does the "old" eye. With the old eye open and the new eye closed, spectral violet is undetected and blue tends a bit towards having a cyan tint due to the aging, yellowed lens. In the new eye, spectral violet is more easily detected and blue looks bluer. But when both eyes are used together the brain blends what I see, and my colour vision is normal. With old yellowed lenses we have no awareness that blue is appearing with a yellowish overlay because the brain is the interpreter of the signal we get from the retina (as you all already know!). When I say "old" here I mean past teen years. That lens in our eye begins to yellow quite early on. Wear your sunglasses when outdoors!!!! B) B) B) B) B)
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.