• Ultraviolet Photography
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And so far...................

3 replies to this topic

#1 Daryll

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 17:17

Well having read the forum over and over again , I find my self in the company of experts , it is overwhelming to see what can be achieved.
So as a out and out beginner I have the following.
  • Un-modified Nikon D50
  • Nikon series E 50mm lens
  • Convoy S2 365nm UV water proof torch

things I think i need
  • Filter to go on front of torch maybe https://www.edmundop...andpass-filter/
  • Will I need a uv/ir cut filter on the front of the lens, if so which one, bearing in mind I have a small budget for gear

Method...

for flowers , I have a small shed , which is dark , at night it is pitch black inside , vase to put flowers in , conventional torch to aid focus , holder for UV torch , turn on UV light ( turn off normal torch)
And experiment with camera settings until I get desired effect , well thats the idea , unless you have better ideas

Cheers

Daryll

#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 21:53

Is your goal to make a reflected-UV photograph, that is, UV-only? Or a visible fluorescence photograph where the fluorescence is induced by UV??

For a UV-only photograph, you typically would need a UV-pass filter on your lens. However, if you make the photograph in the dark shed with ONLY the UV torch as illumination, then I think you can try shooting without a UV-pass filter on the lens. If I'm recalling correctly, the Conway does not emit any IR. And if it emits any visible (violet or blue) light, the amounts would be negligible in the dark. (I'm sure other members will correct this (please) if I am wrong about the Conway's properties.

Because your D50 is unmodified, it does block some UV. So your exposures will be long in order to record enough UV to make the photo. Thus you would need to have the camera on a tripod or otherwise immobile for a exposure of several seconds.

Give it a try!!! That's the only way we know if it will work. Post what you get. And if something looks flaky, we can suggest the next course of action.

Eventually you will want a UV-pass filter so you can make UV-only photos in sunlight -- like landscapes and portraits and so forth. The Filters Sticky contains many possibilities.
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.

#3 Daryll

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 15:58

Thank you Andrea.
I think ( well theres a thing...lol) I would like visible fluorescence induced by UV , haveing seen some of the work on here , I will give it a try , who knows what the out come will be

Cheers

Daryll

#4 Andrea B.

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 18:04

Ok, to make a UV-induced visible fluorescence photo, you will definitely need a filter on your lens to block the UV and permit only passage of the visible fluorescence.
Read all about it here: <> Sticky :: UV-Induced Visible Fluorescence <>
Andrea G. Blum
Often found hanging out with flowers & bees.